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I wrote a non-static Generic class instantiator for my Abstract Factory design, and use Singleton approach to make sure that only 1 instance of the instantiator will be initialized for every client request.

public sealed class FactoryInstantiator<T> where T: class
{
    private static readonly FactoryInstantiator<T> _instance = new Instantiator<T>();
    public static FactoryInstantiator<T> Instance
    {
        get
        {
            _client = HttpContext.Current.Session["ClientCode"].ToString();
            return _instance;
        }
    }

    private static string _client;
    private string _className;
    private string _fullyQualifiedClassName;
    private string _assemblyName;

    private FactoryInstantiator() { }

    public T CreateInstance()
    {
        string fullClassName = typeof(T).ToString();
        string[] splitClassName = fullClassName.Split('.');
        _className = splitClassName[2];
        _assemblyName = splitClassName[0] + "." + _client + "." + splitClassName[1];
        _fullyQualifiedClassName = _assemblyName + "." + _className;

        return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(_fullyQualifiedClassName + "," + _assemblyName));
    }
}

I abstracted the the whole namespace for each Client

namespace InventorySuite.Factory.BusinessLogic
{
    // abstract factory
    public abstract class InvoiceFactory
    {
        public abstract void Set() { }
    }
}

namespace InventorySuite.Client1.BusinessLogic
{
    // concrete invoice class for Client1
    public class Invoice : InvoiceFactory
    {
        public override void Set() { }
    }
}

namespace InventorySuite.Client2.BusinessLogic
{
    // concrete invoice class for Client2
    public class Invoice : InvoiceFactory
    {
        public override void Set() { }
    }
}


protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{       
    InvoiceFactory clientInvoice;

    Session.Add("ClientCode", "Client1");
    clientInvoice = FactoryInstantiator<InvoiceFactory>.Instance.CreateInstance();
    clientInvoice.Set();

    Session["ClientCode"] = "Client2";
    clientInvoice = FactoryInstantiator<InvoiceFactory>.Instance.CreateInstance();
    clientInvoice.Set();

}

It works well and already tested it, but my question is about its efficiency/performance hit, since I use reflection here, and for the Singleton approach if it has multi-threading issues (afaik, the singleton instance will be shared in all clients). I will also appreciate any other approach on this. thanks

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3  
Seems like a solution looking for a problem, to me. –  Mark Nov 13 '10 at 18:40
    
Put a lock around the line which creates the factory, and test the performance by calling the factory thousands of times in a loop, measuring & comparing the time. –  Richard Astbury Nov 13 '10 at 18:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will not have any multi-threading issue since you're creating a new instance every time.

About the performance. You can measure the time creating 100 instances:

long ini = Environment.TickCount;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    Session["ClientCode"] = "Client2";
    clientInvoice = FactoryInstantiator<InvoiceFactory>.Instance.CreateInstance();
    clientInvoice.Set();
}
long timeCreate100Instances = Environment.TickCount - ini;

Using reflection, the performance hit resides in loading the assembly. I think that in your case, the class you're loading is in the same dll, you you also will not experiment any performance issue.

In other case, you can cache the Assembly obejcts in a Hastable/Dictionary in your CreateInstance() method.

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using Richard and Daniel suggestions, I was able to reduce the performance hit of reflection using Caching. I therefore conclude that Reflection really has huge performance issues.

  public T CreateInstance()
    {
        string fullClassName = typeof(T).ToString();
        string[] splitClassName = fullClassName.Split('.');
        _className = splitClassName[2];
        _assemblyName = splitClassName[0] + "." + _client + "." + splitClassName[1];
        _fullyQualifiedClassName = _assemblyName + "." + _className;

        // use caching
        T obj;
        if (HttpContext.Current.Cache[_fullyQualifiedClassName] == null)
        {
            obj = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(_fullyQualifiedClassName + "," + _assemblyName));
            HttpContext.Current.Cache.Insert(_fullyQualifiedClassName, obj, null, DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(1), TimeSpan.Zero);
        }
        else
        {
            obj = (T)HttpContext.Current.Cache[_fullyQualifiedClassName];
        }

        return obj;
    }


protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    InvoiceFactory inv;

    Stopwatch globalTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();

    //normal instantiation
    globalTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int x = 0; x <= 10000; x++)
        inv = new InventorySuit.Client1.BusinessLogic.Invoice;
    globalTimer.Stop();
    Response.Write(globalTimer.ElapsedMilliseconds + "<BR>");
    //result 0ms


    // using singleton factory w/o caching
    globalTimer = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int x = 0; x <= 10000; x++)
        inv = new FactoryInstantiator<InvoiceFactory>().CreateInstance();
    globalTimer.Stop();
    Response.Write(globalTimer.ElapsedMilliseconds + "<BR>");
    //result 129ms

    // using singleton factory w/ caching
    for (int x = 0; x <= 10000; x++)
        inv = FactoryInstantiator<InvoiceFactory>.Instance.CreateInstance();
    globalTimer.Stop();
    Response.Write(globalTimer.ElapsedMilliseconds + "<BR>");
    //result 21ms



}
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I added 1 digit on that for loop ctr and the result was telling. –  CSharpNoob Nov 13 '10 at 19:43
1  
Be carefull, because now you're using a shared instance, now you could have multi-threading issues. Your instances now must be thread safe. –  Daniel Peñalba Nov 13 '10 at 19:46
    
you conclude that reflection has huge performance issues from this? I would conclude that, although plain reflection is ~6 times slower than your chached version, if you can instantiate 10000 items in 129ms, that's fast enough for anyone. –  Matt Ellen Nov 13 '10 at 19:50
    
@Daniel you mean the Cache instance? how about I store it on Session State instead? does this solve multi threading issue since different users have different sessions? thanks –  CSharpNoob Nov 13 '10 at 20:03
    
@Matt, i replace 10000 to 1000000, and the reflected instance without cache is 2sec slower and the non-cached is 12sec slower. In my project, I might use the instantiator inside a loop that displays thousands or even millions of data from the database =) –  CSharpNoob Nov 13 '10 at 20:25

Loading the assemblies in Session State to solve multi-threading issue.

   public T CreateInstance()
    {
        string fullClassName = typeof(T).ToString();
        string[] splitClassName = fullClassName.Split('.');
        _className = splitClassName[2];
        _assemblyName = splitClassName[0] + "." + _client + "." + splitClassName[1];
        _fullyQualifiedClassName = _assemblyName + "." + _className;


        T obj;
        var assemblies = HttpContext.Current.Session["ASSEMBLIES"] as Dictionary<string, T>;

        if (assemblies == null)
        {
            assemblies = new Dictionary<string, T>();
            assemblies.Add(_fullyQualifiedClassName, null);
            HttpContext.Current.Session.Add("ASSEMBLIES", assemblies);
        }

        obj = assemblies[_fullyQualifiedClassName] as T;

        if (obj == null)
        {
            obj = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(_fullyQualifiedClassName + "," + _assemblyName));
            assemblies[_fullyQualifiedClassName] = obj;
        }



        return obj;
    }
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