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I would like to create sorted set of points according to x or y coordinates.

typedef std::set <Point2D, sorter> Points;

For the type of "Point" I would like to use a different comparators. The first one sorts points according to the x coordinates, the second one according to the y coordinates:

typedef std::set <Point2D, sortPointsByX()> Points;
typedef std::set <Point2D, sortPointsByy()> Points;

where

class sortPoints2DByX
{
    public:

            bool operator() ( const Point2D &p1, const Point2D &p2 );

};

class sortPoints2DByY
{
    public:

            bool operator() ( const Point2D &p1, const Point2D &p2 );

};

Is it possible to create a pointer to the constructor sortPoints2DByX/sortPoints2DByY classes in Points declaration

typedef std::set <Point2D, pointer_to_somparator_class> Points;

and by the need to use any of them?

I need to have one data type can be sorted in two ways.

If this idea is wrong, is there any more suitable solution?

I need to compute median of x and y coordinates...

Thanks for your help...

share|improve this question
    
Is the problem that you need to change how a given set is sorted, or is the problem that you need to be able to pass the set around without having the things you're passing it to have two different methods for the two different set types? –  Omnifarious Nov 13 '10 at 20:16
    
I have two solutions that are both based on the fact that ::std::set will take a comparator as a constructor argument. This will not allow you to reorder a set on the fly, but it will let you use the same type to keep two different orders in two different objects. @André Caron also has a solution based on ::std::set's constructor argument. –  Omnifarious Nov 13 '10 at 22:27

2 Answers 2

Is it possible to create a pointer to the constructor sortPoints2DByX/sortPoints2DByY classes in Points declaration?

No, you cannot take the address a class' constructor.

I need to have one data type can be sorted in two ways.

You can get around using pointers to functions. Example implementation:

#include <algorithm>
#include <set>
#include <iostream>

    // Your implementation may differ.
struct Point
{
    int x; int y;
    Point(int x_, int y_)
        : x(x_), y(y_) {}
};

    // For display purposes.
void print(const Point& point)
{
    std::cout << '(' << point.x
        << ',' << point.y << ')' << std::endl;
}

bool OrderByX ( const Point& lhs, const Point& rhs )
{
    return (lhs.x < rhs.x);
}

bool OrderByY ( const Point& lhs, const Point& rhs )
{
    return (lhs.y < rhs.y);
}

    // Type of comparison operator.
typedef bool(*Comparator)
    (const Point&lhs,const Point&rhs);

    // Set used to store points in sorted order.
typedef std::set<Point, Comparator> Points;

int main ( int, char ** )
{
        // Each set ordered with it's own criteria.
    Points by_x(&OrderByX);
    Points by_y(&OrderByY);

        // Insert each point in both sets.
    by_x.insert(Point(1,2)); by_y.insert(Point(1,2));
    by_x.insert(Point(3,1)); by_y.insert(Point(3,1));
    by_x.insert(Point(4,3)); by_y.insert(Point(4,3));
    by_x.insert(Point(2,4)); by_y.insert(Point(2,4));

        // Show that 1st set is in proper order.
    std::cout << "Sorted by X:" << std::endl;
    std::for_each(by_x.begin(), by_x.end(), &print);
    std::cout << std::endl;

        // Show that 2nd set is in proper order.
    std::cout << "Sorted by Y:" << std::endl;
    std::for_each(by_y.begin(), by_y.end(), &print);
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

It generates the following output:

Sorted by X:
(1,2)
(2,4)
(3,1)
(4,3)

Sorted by Y:
(3,1)
(1,2)
(4,3)
(2,4)
share|improve this answer

I have two solutions, both of which have been tested:

First, code common to both:

class Point2D {
 public:
   Point2D(int x, int y) : x_(x), y_(y) { }

   int getX() const { return x_; }
   int getY() const { return y_; }

 private:
   int x_, y_;
};

And the main function...

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   Points s1(compareByX);
   Points s2(compareByY);
   const int size = 1750;

   for (int x = -size; x <= size; ++x) {
      for (int y = -size; y <= size; ++y) {
         Point2D p(x, y);
         s1.insert(p);
         s2.insert(p);
      }
   }
   return 0;
}

Now, for solution 1:

#include <tr1/functional>
#include <set>

typedef ::std::tr1::function<bool (const Point2D &, const Point2D &)> comparefunc_t;
typedef ::std::set <Point2D, comparefunc_t> Points;

bool compareByX(const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b)
{
   return (a.getX() != b.getX()) ?
      (a.getX() < b.getX()) : (a.getY() < b.getY());
}

bool compareByY(const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b)
{
   return (a.getY() != b.getY()) ?
      (a.getY() < b.getY()) : (a.getX() < b.getX());
}

And the much longer solution 2:

class Point2DComparator {
 public:
   virtual bool operator()(const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b) const = 0;

 protected:
   const Point2DComparator &operator =(const Point2DComparator &b) {
      return *this;
   }
   Point2DComparator(const Point2DComparator &b) { }
   Point2DComparator() { }
};

class Point2DComparatorEnvelope : public Point2DComparator {
 public:
   Point2DComparatorEnvelope(const Point2DComparator &letter)
        : letter_(letter)
   {
   }

   virtual bool operator()(const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b) const {
      return letter_(a, b);
   }

 private:
   const Point2DComparator &letter_;
};

class XComparator : public Point2DComparator {
 public:
   virtual bool operator() ( const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b) const {
      return (a.getX() != b.getX()) ?
              (a.getX() < b.getX()) : (a.getY() < b.getY());
   }
};

class YComparator : public Point2DComparator {
 public:
   virtual bool operator() ( const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b) const {
      return (a.getY() != b.getY()) ?
              (a.getY() < b.getY()) : (a.getX() < b.getX());
   }
};

typedef ::std::set<Point2D, Point2DComparatorEnvelope> Points;
XComparator compareByX;
YComparator compareByY;

They seem virtually (no pun intended) identical in performance. The second is much more complex, though if you peer at the internals of ::std::tr1::function you will see that it is extremely hairy. The second is mainly useful for demonstration purposes. IMHO, the standard is broken for requiring the stupid envelope/letter hack for the whole thing to work.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to construct KD-tree and I need to quickly and repeatedly compute median... –  Ian Nov 13 '10 at 21:04
    
That won't work. Because std::set<> will make a copy of a Point2DSorter, your instances are going to be sliced and the proper comparison operator won't be invoked. –  André Caron Nov 13 '10 at 21:05
    
@Ian: if your real question is how to implement a KD-tree, there is no standard container that provides this facility directly. –  André Caron Nov 13 '10 at 21:07
    
@André Caron - You're probably right, in which case the implementation of set is broken. And if the standard doesn't say it's broken, the standard is broken. –  Omnifarious Nov 13 '10 at 21:11
    
@Andre I am writting it myself. But in my opinion, repeated median finding results in significant slowdown of the KD tree construction. i want to do it as much as fast... –  Ian Nov 13 '10 at 21:14

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