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I'm converting some C code to Delphi. Can someone please explain to me what this line means?

nResult = ( (pBuffer[ 0 ] << 8) & 0xFF00 )
 | ( pBuffer[ 1 ] & 0x00FF );

Here is the rest of the code for context:

USHORT UTIL_htons( USHORT hostshort )
{
 PUCHAR pBuffer;
 USHORT nResult;

 nResult = 0;
 pBuffer = (PUCHAR )&hostshort;

 nResult = ( (pBuffer[ 0 ] << 8) & 0xFF00 )
  | ( pBuffer[ 1 ] & 0x00FF );

 return( nResult );
}

USHORT UTIL_ntohs( USHORT netshort )
{
 return( UTIL_htons( netshort ) );
}
ULONG UTIL_htonl( ULONG hostlong )
{
 PUCHAR pBuffer;
 ULONG nResult;
 UCHAR c, *pResult;

 pBuffer = (PUCHAR )&hostlong;

 if( !pBuffer )
 {
  return( 0L );
 }

 pResult = (UCHAR * )&nResult;

 c = ((UCHAR * )pBuffer)[ 0 ];
 ((UCHAR * )pResult)[ 0 ] = ((UCHAR * )pBuffer)[ 3 ];
 ((UCHAR * )pResult)[ 3 ] = c;

 c = ((UCHAR * )pBuffer)[ 1 ];
 ((UCHAR * )pResult)[ 1 ] = ((UCHAR * )pBuffer)[ 2 ];
 ((UCHAR * )pResult)[ 2 ] = c;

 return( nResult );
}
ULONG UTIL_ntohl( ULONG netlong )
{
 return( UTIL_htonl( netlong ) );
}

Thanks in advance Bojan

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3  
What have you tried so far? What are you stuck on? We like helping people who help themselves, not just do their work for them. –  Oded Nov 13 '10 at 21:02
    
Ok. To rephrase the question. Can someone explain me the meaning of this line nResult = ( (pBuffer[ 0 ] << 8) & 0xFF00 ) | ( pBuffer[ 1 ] & 0x00FF ); –  bojan gavrilovic Nov 13 '10 at 21:11
1  
I thick quoted line is self explaining. it gets 8 bits from one buffer element, then 8 bits from another, then concatenates them togeter. –  Vovanium Nov 14 '10 at 0:17
1  
It's only self-explanatory if you know how to read C, @Vovanium. That means knowing the format for hexadecimal numbers, and knowing the meanings of several operators. –  Rob Kennedy Nov 14 '10 at 2:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Apparently (all those defines in uppercase make it hard reading) the functions are swapping the internal byte ordering of values that occupy 2 or 4 bytes. For example:

UTIL_htons(0x1234); /* returns 0x3412 */
UTIL_htonl(0x12345678); /* returns 0x78563412 */

I have no idea how to write them in Delphi ...

Hopefully they are already written and the library Delphi uses has them with some name or other. Check your documentation.


Edit

nResult = ( (pBuffer[ 0 ] << 8) & 0xFF00 ) | ( pBuffer[ 1 ] & 0x00FF );

in this line

pBuffer[0] is the first element of the array pBuffer
pBuffer[0] << 8 is shifting that value 8 bits to the left (0x12 becomes 0x1200)
(...) & 0xFF00 is redundant: it resets the rightmost 8 bits

In pBuffer[1] & 0x00FF only the rightmost 8 bits are kept (so 0x1234 becomes 0x0034)

The other operation | is a bitwise or

( ... & 0xFF00) | ( ... & 0xFF00) is the leftmost 8 bits of the first part and the rightmost 8 bits of the second part.


Edit: hto* / *toh naming

The functions htonl, htons, ntohl, ntohs in C are used to convert values between host and network byte order.

The byte ordering is not necessarily different (network byte order is big-endian), so the first part of the functions should check if the host byte ordering is little- or big-endian before doing the swaps ... or the check was done previously in the program that uses the functions you posted.

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Thank you for your answers. In debugging c code and delphi code I made have some similar results: for example nIPOffset = UTIL_ntohs(64) using VC debugger shows value 16384. Same result I have in delphi using ntohs(64). But printf("nIPOffset %d\n", nIPOffset); shows 20. –  bojan gavrilovic Nov 13 '10 at 21:31
    
nIPOffset = UTIL_ntohs(ip->ip_off); //debugger shows 16384 same is delphi result printf("nIPOffset %d\n", nIPOffset); //on screen result is 20. That is offset when I have to read new data. Length of data is about 40 –  bojan gavrilovic Nov 13 '10 at 21:36
    
Using "%d" in printf tells printf to use an int (usually 4 bytes) from the arguments. But nIPOffset appears to be a long or long long (8 bytes). If my assumptions are correct printf will ignore 4 bytes of the value. –  pmg Nov 13 '10 at 21:41
    
To print a value of type long use printf("%ld", value);; for a value of type long long use printf("%lld"). –  pmg Nov 13 '10 at 21:50
    
can you explain next please unsigned char ihl: 4, version: 4; –  bojan gavrilovic Nov 13 '10 at 22:31

You do not have to translate them, just include WinSock, it has all four of them!

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It seems to be just a swap of bytes which you can implement very simply:

function Swap32(const Value: DWORD): DWORD; assembler;
asm
  bswap eax;
end;

function Swap16(const Value: WORD): WORD; assembler;
asm
  xchg al, ah;
end;
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There is awkwardly marked backward compatibility only intrinsic Swap() procedure for 16 bit byteswap (inlined, save on CALL/RET) Also, what is const specifier? Do you really want to byteswap address of parameter? –  Free Consulting Nov 14 '10 at 12:57
    
No I don't want to swap the address, the const is just because we don't need to make a copy –  Remko Nov 15 '10 at 7:13

rather obscure bitwise expression

nResult = ( (pBuffer[ 0 ] << 8) & 0xFF00 )
 | ( pBuffer[ 1 ] & 0x00FF );

implies what:

var 
  pBuffer: PByteArray; 
  nResult: Word;

so, Pascal's structured clarity would look like:

WordRec(nResult).Hi := pBuffer^[0];
WordRec(nResult).Lo := pBuffer^[1];

even implicit byteswap is being pretty obvious here

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