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Im trying to start to use Unity but i got stock in a point.

I have a Context class and a Repository class being resolved by the container. My Repository class take a Context ctor parameter as a Dependency.

My Config file:

container:

  <register type="IGeneralContext" mapTo="Data.EF.EFContext, Data.EF">
    <lifetime type="singleton" />
    <constructor>
      <param name="connectionString">
        <value value="anyConnStr"/>
      </param>
    </constructor>
  </register>

  <register type="IClienteRepository" mapTo="Repository.EF.ClientRepository, Repository.EF">
    <constructor>
      <param name="context">
        <dependency type="Data.EF.EFContext, Data.EF"/>
      </param>
    </constructor>
  </register>

And now, I want that a new instance of IGeneralContext get constructed when Resolve is called AND the old one was already released.

See:

using (IGeneralContext context = container.Resolve<IGeneralContext>()) //NEW CONTEXT INSTANCE
{
    IClienteRepository rep = container.Resolve<IClienteRepository>(); // USE DEPENDENCY AS SINGLETON
    Cliente nc = new Cliente() {  };
    rep.Add(nc);
    context.CommitChanges();
} // DISPOSE CONTEXT

using (IGeneralContext context = container.Resolve<IGeneralContext>()) //BRAND NEW CONTEXT INSTANCE
{
    IClienteRepository rep = container.Resolve<IClienteRepository>(); // USE DEPENDENCY AS SINGLETON
    Cliente nc = new Cliente() { };
    rep.Add(nc);
    context.CommitChanges();
} // DISPOSE CONTEXT

IClienteRepository rep1 = container.Resolve<IClienteRepository>(); // NEW CONTEXT AGAIN
Cliente cliente1= rep1.GetById(1);

Any idea how to solve it using Unity?

Tks.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After analysing better James suggestion, I found a good alternative.

There is a new way to delegate the instantiations to a factory:

        container.RegisterType<IMyInterface, MyConcrete>(new InjectionFactory(c => MyFactoryClass.GetInstance()));

And also it is possible to extend the configuration file to do it for you.

See ctavares post at CodePlex, he/she has a very nice example. http://unity.codeplex.com/Thread/View.aspx?ThreadId=219565

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Take a look at the StaticFactory extension. You to supply your own method for object creation, which allows you to detect whether your existing context is still available.

http://www.pnpguidance.net/post/RegisteringFactoryMethodCreateObjectsUnityStaticFactoryExtension.aspx

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Thaks James, as a told to Steven I brought Unity to my project to simplify my design. If was possible go just by configuring th XML config file I'd find better keep going on this way. Once it's is not possible yet i will delegate these instantiations to a Factory Method. –  RobertoBr Nov 15 '10 at 17:33
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You might want to take a step back and look at your design. I found out that most of the time I thought I needed some complex DI configuration, the problem was actually in my design. Here are a few options you could consider:

1) Use a factory for creating repositories and supply the context to that factory:

var repositoryFactory = container.Resolve<IRepositoryFactory>();

using (var context = container.Resolve<IGeneralContext>())
{
    var rep = repositoryFactory.Create<IClienteRepository>(context);
    // ...
}

public class RepositoryFactory : IRepositoryFactory
{
    public TRepository Create<TRepository>(IGeneralContext context)
        where TRepository : IRepository
    {
        var repository = Container.Resolve<TRepository>();
        repository.Context = context;
        return repository;
    }
}

2) Try making the repositories part of the context:

using (var context = container.Resolve<IGeneralContext>())
{
    var nc = new Cliente() { };
    context.Clientes.Add(nc);
    // ...
}

If it is not possible to put all those repository properties on the context itself, you might want to create a wrapper object:

using (var context = container.Resolve<NorthwindContext>())
{
    var nc = new Cliente() { };
    context.ClienteRepository.Add(nc);

    // ...
}

public class NorthwindContext
{
    private IGeneralContext context;
    private IRepositoryFactory repFactory;

    public NorthwindContext(IGeneralContext context,
        IRepositoryFactory repFactory)
    {
        this.context = context;
        this.repFactory = repFactory;
    }

    public IClienteRepository Clientes
    {
        get { return this.repFactory
            .Create<IClienteRepository>(this.context); }
    }

    public IOrderRepository Orders
    {
        get { return this.repFactory
            .Create<IOrderRepository>(this.context); }
    }

    public void CommitChanges()
    {
        this.context.CommitChanges();
    }
}

You also might want to try minimizing the amount of calls to the container. Try to inject as much as you can through the constructor.

Here is an interesting SO question about the Unit of Work pattern (= context) and repositories that might be helpful.

I hope this helps.

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Thaks Steven, it was very helpful. I'm using Unity just to simplify the instantiation of my Unit of work and repositories. Once I have no other reason to go this way I found better to use a simply Factory (with no Unity) to do the job for the developers. Would be really good if it was possible just by configuring the XML config file, or even with a little adjustment in my design. Anyway.. thank you very much! –  RobertoBr Nov 15 '10 at 17:21
    
You're welcome. –  Steven Nov 15 '10 at 18:17
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