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I'm aware of mutuable vs immutable arguments in Python, and which is which, but here is a weird issue I ran into with mutable arguments. The simplified version is as follows:

def fun1a(tmp):
    tmp.append(3)
    tmp.append(2)
    tmp.append(1)
    return True

def fun1(a):
    b = fun1a(a)
    print a #prints [3,2,1]
    return b

def fun2a():
    tmp = []
    tmp.append(3)
    tmp.append(2)
    tmp.append(1)
    return [True, tmp]

def fun2(a):
    [b, a] = fun2a()
    print a #prints [3,2,1]
    return b

def main():
    a=[]
    if fun1(a):
        print a #prints [3,2,1]
    if fun2(b):
        print b #prints garbage, e.g. (0,1)

As you can see the only difference is that fun2 points the passed in argument to reference a list created inside fun2a, while fun1 simply appends to the list created in main. In the end, fun1 returns the correct result, while fun2 returns random garbage rather than the result I'd expect. What's the problem here?

Thanks

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4  
This code doesn't make too much sense. Where did you declare the variable b you are accessing in main? –  Jim Brissom Nov 14 '10 at 1:00
    
How is that not a runtime error? –  Falmarri Nov 14 '10 at 23:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This isn't so much of a mutable/immutable issue as one of scope.

"b" exists only in fun1 and fun2 bodies. It is not present in the main or global scope (at least intentionally)

--EDIT--

>>> def fun1(b):
...     b = b + 1
...     return b
... 
>>> def fun2(a):
...     b = 1
...     return b
... 
>>> fun1(5)
6
>>> fun2(b)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'b' is not defined

(From my interpreter in terminal)

I'm guessing your 'b' was initialized somewhere else. What happened in the other function is of has no effect on this.

This is me running your exact code:

>>> main()
[3, 2, 1]
[3, 2, 1]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in main
NameError: global name 'b' is not defined
>>> b = 'whatever'
>>> main()
[3, 2, 1]
[3, 2, 1]
[3, 2, 1]
whatever
share|improve this answer
    
So I can't pass an undefined variable to a function expecting it to be defined inside like I could with a C++ pointer? I was under the impression mutable objects in Python behaved very similar to pointers of C++ –  Alexander Tsepkov Nov 14 '10 at 1:06
1  
@user507078: in C++ you'd have to define the pointer too, and here you didn't define the pointer (b in main()) so it won't work. The variable name has to be defined somewhere. –  Wolph Nov 14 '10 at 1:09
    
Nope, I think you are confused bc you have a lot else going on and the same names repeating in different scopes. Look at my edit, i tried to simplify the situation –  jon_darkstar Nov 14 '10 at 1:10
    
While he was missing the b declaration, that's not what his question is about. fun1a takes in a reference to a list and populates it. fun2a creates a list and passes it back. It doesn't work because the passed in reference (copy of the address in main) to fun2 gets reassigned and doesn't affect the b in main. –  Brian Clements Nov 14 '10 at 1:23
    
Yes Brian, that's exactly what I was getting confused about. Thanks guys –  Alexander Tsepkov Nov 14 '10 at 1:27

As others have pointed out, there is no name 'b' in your main() function.

A better way of asserting how your code is behaving is to unit test it. Unit-testing is very easy in Python and a great habit to get into. When I first started writing Python a few years back the guy I paired with insisted on testing everything. Since that day I have continued and have never had to use the Python debugger as a result! I digress...

Consider:

import unittest

class Test(unittest.TestCase):

    def test_fun1a_populates_tmp(self):
        some_list = []
        fun1a(tmp=some_list)
        self.assertEquals([3, 2, 1], some_list)

    def test_fun1a_returns_true(self):
        some_list = []
        ret = fun1a(tmp=some_list)
        self.assertTrue(ret)

    def test_fun1_populates_a(self):
        some_list = []
        fun1(a=some_list)
        self.assertEquals([3, 2, 1], some_list)

    def test_fun1_returns_true(self):
        some_list = []
        ret = fun1(a=some_list)
        self.assertTrue(ret)

    def test_fun2a_populates_returned_list(self):
        ret = fun2a()
        self.assertEquals([True, [3, 2, 1]], ret)

    def test_fun2_returns_true(self):
        some_list = []
        ret = fun2(some_list)
        self.assertTrue(ret)

    def test_fun2_des_not_populate_passed_list(self):
        some_list = []
        fun2(some_list)
        self.assertEqual(0, len(some_list))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Each of these unit tests pass and document how your functions behave (save for the printing, you can add the tests for those if they are needed). They also provide a harness for when you edit your code, because they should continue to pass or start failing if you break something.

I haven't unit-tested main(), since it is clearly broken.

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The problem may be related to the difference between lists and tuples. In fun2, don't put brackets around a,b. In fun2a, return a tuple of the two objects and not a list. Python should write the varaibles correctly, if that's the problem that you're trying to solve. Also, you called fun2 with argument b when b was never defined. Of course, the parameter for fun2 is never actually used, because it is rewritten before it is read.

In the end, your code should look like this:

def fun1a(tmp):
tmp.append(3)
tmp.append(2)
tmp.append(1)
return True

def fun1(a):
    b = fun1a(a)
    print a #prints [3,2,1]
    return b

def fun2a():
    tmp = []
    tmp.append(3)
    tmp.append(2)
    tmp.append(1)
    return (True, tmp)

def fun2():
    b, a = fun2a()
    print a #prints [3,2,1]
    return b

def main():
    a=[]
    if fun1(a):
        print a #prints [3,2,1]
    if fun2():
        print b #prints garbage, e.g. (0,1)

which should print [3,2,1] both times.

share|improve this answer
    
There are actually 4 prints. He wants to assign to the passed in reference. Your change wouldn't help that. –  Brian Clements Nov 14 '10 at 1:18
    
apeending to a in fun1a should affect the original list. I tried it out. –  Zonedabone Nov 14 '10 at 1:22
    
Yes, but the value doesn't get back to main, which was his question. –  Brian Clements Nov 14 '10 at 1:24

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