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Maye I am wrong to use now() to get timestamps when storing data?

When I display date/time to the user, of course he wants to see a local time, and if he inputs time related data, rather than me using now() then he will be inputting local date/time.

Why code is getting muddled with conversations - what's the best practice for handling timestamps? UTC/locla time? How & when to adjust?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just store all the dates in timestamp mysql column type, which can handle all timezone issues, and mysql will do all work for you.

So in the begin of your application startup all you need is to specify what timezone you need the dates belongs towith query:

SET time_zone='Asia/Vladivostok'

For example.

Also, in this case you should not get any timestamps from php, if you need to insert current time - you have to use mysql's NOW().

That's all.

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+1 That sounds good. Let's imagine that I don't know what timezone the s/w is in, can I get it automagically somehow? –  Mawg Nov 14 '10 at 23:07
1  
@Mawg: it is another, javascript-related question ;-) stackoverflow.com/questions/1091372/… - this is a possible answer –  zerkms Nov 14 '10 at 23:22
    
Thanks, but I am not allowed client-side solutions :-( –  Mawg Nov 17 '10 at 0:10
    
@Mawg: then the only possible way - is to guess timezone according to user's location (detected by IP). Which is very innacurate. –  zerkms Nov 17 '10 at 0:29

Store all the dates in one time zone so they're consistent. UTC/GMT+0 is good for this.

Then use CONVERT_TZ to convert input to UTC/GMT+0 or from UTC/GMT+0 to a user's time zone.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html

Since all you've asked about are SQL functions, you should tag the question with the RDBMS you're using (MySQL?) instead of PHP.

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+1 And I have now tagged it ODBC (I thought it was a PHP question, but apparently not). If I convert everything to UTC then it is consistent, but as I said in the question, I have to convert everything going in & coming out of the d/b, which is a pain (especially if I miss one). Since there are only 2 answers and the other seems to contradict this one, I will assume that there is no standard "best practice". –  Mawg Nov 14 '10 at 23:11

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