Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I turned an Horizontal ItemsControl to a Listbox so that I am able to select individual items but found that the selection was broken. Took some time to distill out the problematic bit.

Books = new[] { new Book{Id=1, Name="Book1"},
                                 new Book{Id=2, Name="Book2"},
                                 new Book{Id=3, Name="Book3"},
                                 new Book{Id=4, Name="Book4"},
                                 new Book{Id=3, Name="Book3"},
            };

            <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type WPF_Sandbox:Book}">
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}"/>
            </DataTemplate>

<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Books}"/>

If Book is a struct, the listbox selection (default mode : single) goes awry if you select an item which has an equivalent struct in the list. e.g Book3

If Book is turned into a class (with non-value type semantics), selection is fixed.

Choices (so far, don't like any of them):

  • I chose structs because its a small data structure and the value type semantics are useful in comparing 2 instances for equality. Changing it to a class causes me to lose value-type semantics.. I can't use the default Equals anymore or override it for memberwise comparison.
  • Add a differentiating Book attribute purely for the listbox selection to work (e.g. an Index).
  • Eliminate Duplicates.. Not possible.

WPF listbox : problem with selection : states that the Listbox is setting SelectedItem and while updating the UI for this, it just lights up all items in the list that Equal(SelectedItem). Not sure why.. highlighting SelectedIndex would make this problem go away; maybe I am missing something. ListBox is selecting many items even in SelectionMode="Single" : shows the same problem when list items are strings (value type semantics)

share|improve this question
1  
You say you can't override Equals if you use a class. Why not? Overriding Equals is highly recommended when creating a struct anyway, so you shouldn't be using a struct just to obtain an Equals implementation with value semantics. By the way, this behavior is not limited to structs. If you bind to a class type that overrides Equals and two distinct instances are equal, you'll see the same behavior. –  Kent Boogaart Nov 14 '10 at 9:43
    
@Kent - exactly. What I have is a simple data struct, such that if 2 instances have the same members they are equivalent. It was all good till I needed a listbox with selectable items.. I could turn it into a class.. but then if I override Equals to have memberwise compare, I'd be back to square 1 (as I indicated with the second SO q link) where listbox of strings shows the same issue). If I don't override, I need a customEquals method to do a memberwise compare. So it seems like adding a differentiating parameter (like a unique timestamp or Index) to the struct is the best option.. –  Gishu Nov 15 '10 at 2:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not simply use a better collection class as your datasource to overcome the problem

var collection = new[]
 {
     new Book {Id = 1, Name = "Book1"},
     new Book {Id = 2, Name = "Book2"},
     new Book {Id = 3, Name = "Book3"},
     new Book {Id = 4, Name = "Book4"},
     new Book {Id = 3, Name = "Book3"},
 };
 var Books = collection.ToDictionary(b => Guid.NewGuid(), b => b);
 DataContext = Books;

And this will be your DataTemplate

<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding}">
  <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
      <TextBlock Text="{Binding Value.Name}"/>
    </DataTemplate>
  </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
share|improve this answer
    
Dictionary would lose the ordering of the collection... but I get the idea.. wrap the struct in a class. –  Gishu Nov 18 '10 at 15:17

I'm not clear on why you have duplicates in your list, if they're absolutely identical (i.e., if duplicates have all the same content and return true from Equals). You won't have any way to tell which of the duplicates the user has selected. Neither will the ListBox, which is probably why you're having problems.

Maybe, instead of binding directly to a collection of structs, you could wrap each struct in a class? Just define a BookWrapper class that contains a Book struct, and bind to a collection of BookWrappers instead of a collection of Books. You fix the problem of WPF not being able to tell the instances apart, but the rest of your code could continue to have the benefits of a struct.

share|improve this answer
    
In my case I have a struct that contains the results of a unit test run, so it has [Result=Red/Green, NumberOfTests=int]. So running a test run twice, causes two structs to show up in the listbox (the position is the way I differentiate among them - the topmost listitem is the most recent). I ended up adding another attribute to the struct (a Timestamp).. but yeah the ans to the q seems to be wrapping them in a ref-type to make them non-equal. –  Gishu Nov 22 '10 at 12:31

Thanks to Dean Chalk for his idea.

I extend it so that it is easier to user for other structs

The idea is to use a converter to cast the original struct collection to a custom collection, which in turn override the equal to compare with Guid ID. You still has the original order

public class StructListItem
{
    private Guid _id = Guid.NewGuid();
    public Guid ID
    {
        get
        {
            return _id;
        }
        set
        {
            _id = value;
        }
    }

    private object _core = default(object);
    public object Core
    {
        get
        {
            return _core;
        }
        set
        {
            _core = value;
        }
    }

    public StructListItem(object core)
    {
        Core = core;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return ID.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return ID.GetHashCode();
    }
}

public class StructToCollConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (value is IEnumerable)
        {
            List<StructListItem> _ret = new List<StructListItem>();
            if (value != null)
            {
                IEnumerator i = ((IEnumerable)value).GetEnumerator();
                while (i.MoveNext())
                {
                    _ret.Add(new StructListItem(i.Current));
                }
            }
            return _ret.ToArray();
        }

        return null;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

    <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Books, Converter={StaticResource converter}}" SelectionMode="Single">
        <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <StackPanel>
                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding Core.Name}"/>
                </StackPanel>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ListBox.ItemTemplate>

    </ListBox>
share|improve this answer

Garyx

Something a bit simpler maybe ?

public class StructListItem<T> where T : struct
{
    public T Item { get; private set; }
    public readonly Guid Id = Guid.NewGuid();
    public StructListItem(T item)
    {
        Item = item;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<StructListItem<U>> 
        GetStructList<U>(IEnumerable<U> originalList) where U : struct
    {
        return originalList.Select(i => new StructListItem<U>(i));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.