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In python, we can concatenate lists in two ways:

  1. lst.extend(another_lst)
  2. lst += another_lst

I thought extend would be faster than using +=, because it reuses the list instead of creating a new one using the other two.

But when I test it out with timeit, it turns out that += is faster,

>>> timeit('l.extend(x)', 'l = range(10); x = range(10)')
0.16929602623
>>> timeit('l += x', 'l = range(10); x = range(10)')
0.15030503273
>>> timeit('l.extend(x)', 'l = range(500); x = range(100)')
0.805264949799
>>> timeit('l += x', 'l = range(500); x = range(100)')
0.750471830368

Is there something wrong with the code I put in timeit?

share|improve this question
4  
Why += needs to create a new list? Are you confusing it with +? – kennytm Nov 14 '10 at 10:03
1  
Can you use L or 'li as names of example lists? l looks like 1 with some fonts. – Tshepang Nov 14 '10 at 10:09
2  
@Tshepang: you know you can configure font preferences in your browser, right? – SilentGhost Nov 14 '10 at 10:12
3  
@Silent, am aware. But it's good practice to remove that need, especially because my settings are default ("allow pages to choose their own fonts"). – Tshepang Nov 14 '10 at 10:23
4  
Here's an answer explaining how the += overloading works: stackoverflow.com/questions/2347265/… – Scott Griffiths Nov 14 '10 at 10:36
up vote 14 down vote accepted

EDIT: I've tested the performance and I can't replicate the differences to any significant level.


Here's the bytecode -- thanks to @John Machin for pointing out inconsistencies.

>>> import dis
>>> l = [1,2,3]
>>> m = [4,5,6]
>>> def f1(l, m):
...     l.extend(m)
...
>>> def f2(l,m):
...     l += m
...
>>> dis.dis(f1)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (l)
              3 LOAD_ATTR                0 (extend)
              6 LOAD_FAST                1 (m)
              9 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             12 POP_TOP
             13 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             16 RETURN_VALUE
>>> dis.dis(f2)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (l)
              3 LOAD_FAST                1 (m)
              6 INPLACE_ADD
              7 STORE_FAST               0 (l)
             10 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             13 RETURN_VALUE

Notice that extend uses a CALL_FUNCTION instead of an INPLACE_ADD. Any trivial performance differences can probably be put down to this.

share|improve this answer
    
Not only attribute lookup, but also a function call. – Constantin Nov 14 '10 at 10:22
    
@Constantin, mostly attribute lookup I think. INPLACE_ADD just routes to whatever __iadd__ method has been defined on the object. – aaronasterling Nov 14 '10 at 10:25
    
@katriealex, @Constantin, @aaronsterling: Sheesh. It's a LOAD_ATTR and a CALL_FUNCTION as opposed to an INPLACE_ADD and a STORE_FAST – John Machin Nov 14 '10 at 11:00
    
@katriealex: Adding to the confusion, your list was a global in one case and a local in the other. Consider giving minimal examples with identical overheads e.g. in this case def f1(a, b): a.extend(b) and def f2(a, b): a += b – John Machin Nov 14 '10 at 11:05
    
@John: True. Edited, thanks =0. I also can't replicate the performance differences to any significant degree. – katrielalex Nov 14 '10 at 11:14

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