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Hacking my way through a problem, and need help creating a valid MySQL DDL for the following. I am trying to load a file containing employee name, the offices they have occupied in the past and their Job title history separated by a tab.

File:

EmployeeName<tab>OfficeHistory<tab>JobLevelHistory
John Smith<tab>501<tab>Engineer
John Smith<tab>601<tab>Senior Engineer
John Smith<tab>701<tab>Manager
Alex Button<tab>601<tab>Senior Assistant
Alex Button<tab>454<tab>Manager

NOTE: The single table database is completely normalized (as much as a single table may be) -- and for example, in the case of "John Smith" there is only one John Smith; meaning there are no duplicates that would lead to conflicts in referential integrity.

The MyOffice database schema has the following tables:

Employee (nId, name)
Office (nId, number)
JobTitle (nId, titleName)
Employee2Office (nEmpID, nOfficeId)
Employee2JobTitle (nEmpId, nJobTitleID)

So in this case. the tables should look like:

Employee
1 John Smith
2 Alex Button

Office
1 501
2 601
3 701
4 454

JobTitle
1 Engineer
2 Senior Engineer
3 Manager
4 Senior Assistant

Employee2Office
1 1
1 2
1 3
2 2
2 4

Employee2JobTitle
1 1
1 2
1 3
2 4
2 3
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE Employee (
  id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  name CHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE Office (
  id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  office_number INT NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE JobTitle (
  id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  title CHAR(30) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE Employee2JobTitle (
  employee_id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL,
  job_title_id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL,
  FOREIGN KEY (employee_id) REFERENCES Employee(id),
  FOREIGN KEY (job_title_id) REFERENCES JobTitle(id),
  PRIMARY KEY (employee_id, job_title_id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE Employee2Office (
  employee_id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL,
  office_id MEDIUMINT NOT NULL,
  FOREIGN KEY (employee_id) REFERENCES Employee(id),
  FOREIGN KEY (office_id) REFERENCES Office(id),
  PRIMARY KEY (employee_id, office_id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Something along those lines.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and selected as answer, thanks! –  blunders Nov 14 '10 at 12:56
    
In moving forward with your answer, I've got a question, it appears MyISAM does not support foreign keys. Is this true, since it appears that referential integrity checks would not be used. If this is not true, point to MySQL DOCs explaining why, since everything I've found says MySQL allows the syntax but silently ignores referential integrity checks; which is clearly, well bad logic. If this is true that MyISAM does not support foreign keys, please update your answer so that referential integrity checks are in place. Thanks! –  blunders Nov 14 '10 at 14:11
1  
@blunders, sorry, that was a blunder on my part. I have updated the answer to use the InnoDB engine, which does support referential integrity checks. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Nov 14 '10 at 14:16
    
Meaning that I'm guessing that InnoDB would be required. By the way, figured this out by loading the DDL, viewing the structure in a diagram (no relationships were displayed) and then exporting the schema via mysqldump, which said that FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0 –  blunders Nov 14 '10 at 14:18
    
+1 Great, thanks for the quick update! –  blunders Nov 14 '10 at 14:20

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