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In case of Union objects, may a compiler be smart enough to detect at which points what amount of union's memory is used so that the rest memory of union can be used for other purposes as an memory-usage optimization or this is not even allowed due to how standard defines union?

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6 Answers 6

No.

To do that, the compiler would have to know what you are "using" at any given time. How could it possible do that? What if you were using the "unused" section for your own optimisations?

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You are allowed only to read the last written member. A compiler can do whatever it wants with the remainder. A practical use on an architecture able only to write full words not to take care to keep out the other bytes when writing a byte sized members of a larger union. –  AProgrammer Nov 14 '10 at 12:10

A union reserves space sufficient to store the largest of its members1. So, by definition, the same space is reserved for union { double a; byte b } whether you happen to have stored through the double or the byte.

Try not to think of a union as a variant type that can be either a byte or a double or an int depending on which member you happened to write most recently. It is in fact a mechanism for overlaying multiple different data types on the same region of memory, so that region is simultaneously a float and an int and a what-have-you in a sort of quantum superimposition. This is especially useful for type-punning which is when you need to get around the language's type system.

1ANSI/ISO 9899.

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1  
My understanding is that we should think of unions as a variant type and only the member which has been written the more recently can be read and type punning with union is undefined behavior. (The special rules allowing to inspect the common prefix of structures in an union would be without object if it wasn't the case. I'm pretty sure I've already read better references in the standard than that but I can't find them now.) –  AProgrammer Nov 14 '10 at 12:18
    
Well, subverting the type system is always undefined behavior, but it's also sometimes just plain necessary when you are trying to do some platform specific things (like fiddling the sign bits of floats). One of the changes from C90 to C99 was to remove any restriction on accessing one member of a union when the last store was to a different one. Embedded programmers often have to do things that make language purists scream. –  Crashworks Nov 14 '10 at 12:27
    
There is a difference between C++ and C here and I answered in the context of C++. First what is common: in both cases assigning to a member makes the bytes unused by this member undefined (it is very clear in C, 6.2.6.1/7 in N1124) and I think the compiler can assume that what it wrote is still there (but I didn't find a statement as clear). What isn't common, in C reading another member than the last written was implementation defined and now got somewhat defined. As far as I know, in C++ it is undefined (at least I didn't find anything hinting otherwise, I'm interested if you know some). –  AProgrammer Nov 14 '10 at 13:12
    
@Crashworks: the guarantee in C99 only says that the current value of the union (i.e. the last-written value) is reinterpreted, it doesn't say what happens to prior values of the union. So for instance in a union { char c; char ca[4]; }, if you write ca[2], then write c, I don't think it's guaranteed that you can then read back ca[2] and get the value you set for that, whereas you can read ca[0] and get the value of c you set. You might be a bit upset with your compiler vendor, but I think it's conforming behavior. –  Steve Jessop Nov 14 '10 at 13:16
    
@Steve, 6.2.6.1/7 is very clear you can't expect c[1] to keep its value and on an architecture where you can't write a single byte, I expect you won't see it happen. –  AProgrammer Nov 14 '10 at 13:30

No, not really. The compiler has no way to know at any given time how much space is being used. However, there is no reason to use a union in C++, as it only accepts POD types (slightly less restricted in C++0x), and with the boost::variant and boost::any types around, there's no need for such a language feature.

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It's still necessary if you need to overlay two unrelated structures in the same region of memory so you can poke at them in platform-specific ways. For example, union funcdescriptor {uint64 i; void(*fptr)(); struct{ void *toc; void *codeaddress; };}; is probably the easiest way to fish the TOC and IP sections individually out of a function pointer (which is actually a pointer to a descriptor, and so on) when you're working with the PowerPC ABI. –  Crashworks Nov 14 '10 at 12:12

No, a union is aligned according to the alignment requirements of its largest member.

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I can't think how.

It can't use the extra space for a different object, because objects don't overlap in memory unless one is a subobject of the other.

Also, it can't use the extra space at all if you could come along and write the largest member of the union at any second.

In code like this:

{
    union { char c; double d; } x;
    x.c = 1;
    int y;
    some_function(&y);
    std::cout << x.c;
}

I suppose that under the "as-if" rule, the compiler could reduce the stack used for x down to 1 byte, and use the memory immediately after that for y. Since the address of x is never taken, there is no way for a conforming program to "observe" the difference, so it's valid.

Not sure if that's the kind of thing you meant, though, since the use of this union x is surrounded with a lot of restrictions to make that valid. This isn't so much a case of detecting at what points in time the remainder of the union is unused, as detecting that at all points, the remainder is unused.

You might think that the same optimization could apply here:

{
    union { char c; double d; } x;
    x.c = 1;
    int y;
    some_function(&y);
    std::cout << x.c;
    x.d = 1.0;
    std::cout << x.d;
}

but what if some_function were to retain a copy of the pointer to y, perhaps in a global? Then if the overloaded operator<< might end up indirectly calling any code that uses that pointer, it's not valid for the compiler to have overwritten the memory. I doubt that any implementation can fully inline std::cout << x.d, so even if that doesn't happen, the compiler isn't going to know that it doesn't, and can't make the optimization.

For a really huge union, spanning multiple pages of RAM, I think that in theory the physical RAM for the later pages could be released when a small union member is written, and re-mapped back in on demand. Hardly seems worth the implementation bothering with, though, considering that's going to be a very rare case, and not much better than ordinary use of a swap file.

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Theoretically, this is possible. If the compiler is smart enough to analyze your program and finds out that you never ever use the biggest type it can hold, it could optimize the program under the as-if rule. (The program's behavior - except for timing - must be as if the optimization hadn't taken place.)

But it's unlikely that a compiler would do this. It's hard to do so and it's rarely ever applicable.

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