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i'm currently working on my personal Wait Dialog implementation, wich supports task progress update and task cancellation. ATM it is something like:

public partial class WaitDialog : Form
{
    WaitDialog()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public static WaitDialog Instance
    {
        get { return WaitDialogCreator.uniqueInstance; }
    }

    public DialogResult ShowDialog(Form owner, string message)
    {
        Instance.lblWaitMessage.Text = message;

        return Instance.ShowDialog(owner);
    }

    public DialogResult ShowDialog(Form owner, BackgroundWorker worker)
    {
        ...
    }

    public DialogResult ShowDialog(Form owner, string message, BackgroundWorker worker)
    {
        ...
    }

    private class WaitDialogCreator
    {
        static WaitDialogCreator() { }

        internal static readonly WaitDialog uniqueInstance = new WaitDialog();
    }
}

In my ShowDialog() method I can pass a worker object parameter, so that i can set some properties/handlers that depends on its properies, such as the type of progress bar used (marquee if it reports progress changes, continuous otherwise), the possibility to cancel the task (according to WorkerSupportsCancellation prop), etc. The method looks like this:

    public DialogResult ShowDialog(Form owner, BackgroundWorker worker)
    {
        if (worker == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("worker", "A non-null worker must be provided.");
        }
        else
        {
            Instance.btnCancel.Enabled = worker.WorkerSupportsCancellation;

            //This handler close the dialog
            worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(onWorkerWorkComplete);

            if (worker.WorkerReportsProgress)
            {
                Instance.pbProgress.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Continuous;

                //Update the progress bar
                worker.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(onWorkerProgressChanged);
            }

            if (worker.WorkerSupportsCancellation)
            {
                Instance.btnCancel.Click += (sender, e) => { worker.CancelAsync(); };
            }
        }

        return Instance.ShowDialog(owner);
    }

I would access the wait dialog thru a controller on my parent form in this way:

    public Controller(Form window)
    {
        this.window = window;
        this.waitDialog = WaitDialog.Instance;
    }

    ...

    public void ShowWaitDialog(BackgroundWorker worker)
    {
        if (worker == null)
        {
            this.ShowWaitDialog();
        }
        else
        {
            window.BeginInvoke((MethodInvoker)delegate() { waitDialog.ShowDialog(window, worker); });
        }
    }

Maybe that's a very noobish question, but here it is: is it correct to apply (as I do) the Singleton Pattern in this case, or shoud i opt for normal instance creation, given that WaitDialog class ends will normally handle more than a BackGroundWorker in its lifecycle?

The thing that makes me wonder is that I can (and i will) modify WaitDialog's single instance properties each time I pass a new BackGroundWorker in my call to ShowDialog(Form, BackGroundWorker). Is it a correct behavior, according to the pattern? Are there other path i can take for a better implementation? I am open to any suggestion.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, it's a bad idea. The Form class was very much designed as a single-use class. Once a form object is disposed it is dead and cannot be revived. You'll get an ObjectDisposedException when you try to display it again. To prevent this, you'll have to intercept the FormClosing event and stop the default processing. You could call Hide() and set e.Cancel = true. But now you've got the hassle of killing it when you really want to get rid of it.

But perhaps more convincingly, you should only ever cache objects that are very expensive to create but don't take a lot of resources. The Form class is the exact opposite. Creating it is cheap but it takes a very large amount of both managed and unmanaged resources. Especially the latter, a window is a very costly OS object. It may look like a Form is expensive to create but what you see is the cycles that are burned on painting the form. You'll burn the exact same number of cycles when you show a hidden form.

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that's an interesting point of view. So basically it is not too different to create/display once/destroy the form than caching it and disply/hide multiple times... so i'll recereate the form for each background operation. Thanks –  Andrea Pigazzini Nov 14 '10 at 14:48

I would creating a new instance every time.

The reason I would not use a singleton is because the form does not have any meaning beyond the use of one specific wait operation. Singleton patterns are used when you want to setup an instance of a class only once and re-use that instance over and over, with its specific settings.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, that confirms what i was thinking –  Andrea Pigazzini Nov 14 '10 at 14:45
    
You're welcome. –  Pieter van Ginkel Nov 14 '10 at 14:50

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