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I have heard these two terms "temporary table" and "global temporary table" used pretty much in similar context.

What is the difference between the two?

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Nice to know: One can create indexes on global temporary tables in Oracle. –  tuinstoel Jan 7 '09 at 17:44
    
also good to know: indexes already created on an existing (permanent) table come along automatically when doing CREATE GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE AS SELECT from the indexed table. –  noogrub Nov 17 '11 at 15:48

5 Answers 5

In Oracle there isn't any difference. When you create a temporary table in an Oracle database, it is automatically global, and you are required to include the "Global" key word.

The SQL standard, which defines how the term "GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE" is interpreted, allows for either a LOCAL or GLOBAL scope. This would allow for either a user specific table (LOCAL) or everyone (GLOBAL). Oracle implements only the GLOBAL version.

The data you put into an Oracle Temporary table is specific to your session. That is, only you can see your data even if there are 100 users all using the same table, and your data is deleted from the table when you disconnect (or when you commit the current transaction) depending upon table settings.

Contrast this with MS SQL-Server, where temporary tables are local. If you create one, no one besides you knows that your temporary table exists. In Oracle, creating the temporary table allows everyone (well everyone with access to your schema) to see the table. When you log out of your session, the SQL-Server table is deleted and will need to be recreated for the next session. In Oracle, the temporary table is now a permanent part of your schema, even if the data isn't.

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3  
Ah...got it. Informix provides local temporary tables; you have to create them in each session, but anyone may do so. The global temporary table saves you from having to create the table in each session; it 'exists' but it is empty, and its content is unique (and private) per session. Thanks. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 7 '09 at 0:26

Contrast this with MS SQL-Server, where temporary tables are local. If you create one, no one besides you knows that your temporary table exists. In Oracle, creating the temporary table allows everyone (well everyone with access to your schema) to see the table. When you log out of your session, the SQL-Server table is deleted and will need to be recreated for the next session. In Oracle, the temporary table is now a permanent part of your schema, even if the data isn't (if not so you can decide whether to preserve it). The Oracle supports only global temporary table saves you from having to create the table in each session; it 'exists' but it is empty, and its content is unique (and private) per session.

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In our enterprise, we find it wise to DROP and then re-CREATE the global temp table for our reporting purposes (we use SQR) since the temp tables we use are created AS SELECT from other tables in the system. If those tables change, then we are assured that our temp tables match them. –  noogrub Nov 17 '11 at 15:46

Be aware that a global temporary table has no statistics associated with it, so look into whether the dynamic sampling level for the instance should be set to ensure that unanalyzed tables are sampled at parse time. Otherwise the heuristics can lead to a nasty execution plan.

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Additionally, Oracle (global) temp tables are very useful when each of your users/sessions need to each see a different set of data. Just INSERT the records to your global temp table and let Oracle manage keeping one user's set from another's, as well as the cleanup. You don't need to query them with the user's ID, a session id or whatever.

We find them very handy.

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There is no temporary table, only global temporary table. The idea of a global temporary table is that the definition exists and can be seen by all, but data is private for each session. You can also configure if the data is cleaned upon commit or only when the session ends.

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