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Occasionally I want lazy module loading in Python. Usually because I want to keep runtime requirements or start-up times low and splitting the code into sub-modules would be cumbersome. A typical use case and my currently preferred implementation is this:

jinja2 = None

class Handler(...):
    ...
    def render_with_jinja2(self, values, template_name):
        global jinja2
        if not jinja2:
            import jinja2
        env = jinja2.Environment(...)
        ...

I wonder: is there a canonical/better way to implement lazy module loading?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 28 down vote accepted

There's no reason for you to keep track of imports manually -- the VM maintains a list of modules that have already been imported, and any subsequent attempts to import that module result in a quick dict lookup in sys.modules and nothing else.

The difference between your code and

def render_with_jinja2(self, values, template_name):
    import jinja2
    env = jinja2.Environment(...)

is zero -- when we hit that code, if jinja2 hasn't been imported, it is imported then. If it already has been, execution continues on.

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1  
Sometimes more words is detail, but sometimes more words is just more words. :) –  Glenn Maynard Nov 14 '10 at 13:56
    
Never Benchmarked it, but I seem to remember that import wasn't THAT fast. –  mdorseif Nov 14 '10 at 14:00
    
@Glenn -- too much coffee, can't stop typing! –  bgporter Nov 14 '10 at 14:02
    
Also an obvious difference is, that you code pulls the jinja2 only in the local scope - or do I miss something here? –  mdorseif Nov 14 '10 at 16:15
3  
@mdorseif -- there are two different issues. (1) yes, the jinja2 name is only visible inside that function's scope, but (2) the jinja2 module remains cached in sys.modules, so additional imports (on subsequent calls to that function or anywhere else) are effectively no-ops. I assume that you were planning on putting that 'global jinja2; if not jinja2:' code in multiple functions? –  bgporter Nov 14 '10 at 17:06
class Handler(...):
    ...
    def render_with_jinja2(self, values, template_name):
        import jinja2
        env = jinja2.Environment(...)
        ...

There's no need to cache the imported module; Python does that already.

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Hmm. I think I heard that putting modules into the local scope is not considered best practice - although I'm not sure why. –  mdorseif Nov 14 '10 at 14:05
2  
@mdorself It's better practice that what you had rocking. –  aaronasterling Nov 14 '10 at 14:15
    
@aaronasterling care to elaborate? –  mdorseif Nov 14 '10 at 16:18
    
The drawback is that you can't just look at the top of a py file and see what modules it uses, but you could put a comment if you think it's necessary. This is certainly better/cleaner than what the OP was doing, however –  adamJLev Nov 14 '10 at 16:37
3  
The Unladen Swallow talk at PyCon pointed out that for subpackage imports (which is different to this case) there's a reasonable amount of work done parsing and looking up the import levels in sys.modules so don't assume imports are cheap in a frequently-called function (he got a 20% performance improvement optimizing a django function that did this) –  David Fraser Nov 24 '10 at 14:22

The other answers have covered the actual details but if you are interested in a lazy loading library, check out apipkg which is part of the py package (py.test fame).

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This looks very cool indeed! –  piokuc Mar 8 '13 at 18:02

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