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I'm parsing simple (no sections) INI file in PowerShell. Here code I've came up with, is there any way to simplify it?

convertfrom-stringdata -StringData ( `
  get-content .\deploy.ini `
  | foreach-object `
    -Begin { $total = "" }  `
    { $total += "`n" + $_.ToString() } `
    -End { $total } `
).Replace("\", "\\")
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6 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

After searching internet on this topic I've found a handful of solutions. All of them are hand parsing of file data so I gave up trying to make standard cmdlets to do the job. There are fancy solutions as this which support writing scenario.

There are simpler ones and as far as I need no writing support I've chose following very elegant code snippet:

Function Parse-IniFile ($file) {
  $ini = @{}

 # Create a default section if none exist in the file. Like a java prop file.
 $section = "NO_SECTION"
 $ini [$section] = @{}

  switch -regex -file $file {
    "^\[(.+)\]$" {
      $section = $matches[1].Trim()
      $ini[$section] = @{}
    }
    "^\s*([^#].+?)\s*=\s*(.*)" {
      $name,$value = $matches[1..2]
      $ini[$section][$name] = $value.Trim()
    }
  }
  $ini
}

This one is Jacques Barathon's.

Update Thanks to Aasmund Eldhuset and @msorens for enhancements: whitespace trimming and comment support.

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1  
+1; works like a charm! However, I'd suggest changing the key-value regex to (.+?)=(.+) (non-greedy +) in order to handle values that contain =, such as SQL Server connection strings (which, incidentally, is what my INI file contained :-) ). Also, the right hand side should perhaps be (.*) instead of (.+) in order to accomodate empty values. –  Aasmund Eldhuset May 16 '11 at 12:02
    
Thanks to @Aasmund-Eldhuset for the enhancement to allow embedded equal signs. I found one more enhacement needed: the script as is parses commented out lines as if they were active lines! The fix is to change the same regex to ^\s*([^#].+?)=(.*) so that commented lines are ignored. –  Michael Sorens May 18 '11 at 15:53
    
Make that two enhancements: it also needs to ignore extra white space around both key and value. The regex becomes ^\s*([^#].+?)\s*=\s*(.*) and the assignment becomes $ini[$section][$name] = $value.trim() –  Michael Sorens May 18 '11 at 16:25
    
great, but there is a space between $ini and [$section] in line 6 that will cause an error –  mishkin Oct 2 '12 at 18:25
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This is really an extension to the current answer (couldn't seem to append a comment).

I messed around with this to do rudimentary handling of integers and decimals...

function Parse-IniFile ($file)
{
  $ini = @{}
  switch -regex -file $file
  {
    #Section.
    "^\[(.+)\]$"
    {
      $section = $matches[1].Trim()
      $ini[$section] = @{}
      continue
    }
    #Int.
    "^\s*([^#].+?)\s*=\s*(\d+)\s*$"
    {
      $name,$value = $matches[1..2]
      $ini[$section][$name] = [int]$value
      continue
    }
    #Decimal.
    "^\s*([^#].+?)\s*=\s*(\d+\.\d+)\s*$"
    {
      $name,$value = $matches[1..2]
      $ini[$section][$name] = [decimal]$value
      continue
    }
    #Everything else.
    "^\s*([^#].+?)\s*=\s*(.*)"
    {
      $name,$value = $matches[1..2]
      $ini[$section][$name] = $value.Trim()
    }
  }
  $ini
}
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Don Jones almost had it right. Try:

ConvertFrom-StringData((Get-Content .\deploy.ini) -join "`n")

-join converts the Object[] into a single string, with each item in the array separated by a newline char. ConvertFrom-StringData then parses the string into key/value pairs.

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I'm not exactly sure what your source data looks like, or what your goal is. What exactly are you parsing for? Can you post a sample of the file? As-is, it looks like you're just concatenating carriage returns to the existing lines of the file and replacing \ with \.

Nor certain why you're using $.ToString() since $ is already a string object output by Get-Content.

Is the goal just to take a file containing a bunch of name=value pairs, and convert that to a hashtable? That's what ConvertFrom-StringData does, although that cmdlet is only available in the preview of PowerShell v2.

If your file looks like... key1=value1 key2=value2 key3=value3

Then all you should need is

ConvertFrom-StringData (Get-Content .\deploy.ini)

I'm not sure I understand why you're tacking on extra carriage returns. There's also no need to use the -Begin and -End parameters, at least not as far as I can see from what you've posted.

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Your example does not work because of 'unified' get-content cmdlet output. It outputs System.Object[]: ConvertFrom-StringData : Cannot convert 'System.Object[]' to the type 'System.String' required by parameter 'StringData' That's why I iterate wrought it and reassemble to string. –  Artem Tikhomirov Jan 7 '09 at 16:25
    
That's not something I could have determined without looking at your source data, unfortunately. As I tried to indicate, I was trying to help answer your question but I need more information to do so accurately. I thought I made that clear - sorry. –  Don Jones Jan 7 '09 at 19:05
    
No need to give him -1 for him being helpful. And he is stating he does not know for sure what you want. –  Lars Truijens Jan 7 '09 at 21:28
    
An "ini file without sections" could be anything. I have INI files which use key:value, others which use key=value, and others which use an entirely different format. And as I sit here testing it, Get-Content is returning String objects when I give it a text file. If you don't want help, don't ask. –  Don Jones Jan 7 '09 at 22:47
    
Jeez, you're bitter. –  Don Jones Jan 8 '09 at 19:10
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One possibility is to use a .NET ini library. Nini for example.

I've translated the Simple Example from the Nini docs into PowerShell below. You need to put nini.dll into the same directory as the script.

$scriptDir = Split-Path -parent $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition
Add-Type -path $scriptDir\nini.dll

$source = New-Object Nini.Config.IniConfigSource("e:\scratch\MyApp.ini")

$fileName = $source.Configs["Logging"].Get("File Name")
$columns = $source.Configs["Logging"].GetInt("MessageColumns")
$fileSize = $source.Configs["Logging"].GetLong("MaxFileSize")
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nini looks like a library ... not sure for powershell

powershell crash

first step

[void][system.reflection.assembly]::loadfrom("nini.dll") (refer add-type now in ps2 )

after you can use it

$iniwr = new-object nini.config.iniconfigsource("...\ODBCINST.INI") 

$iniwr.Configs et boom 
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