Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm confused about constant objects in C++

When we have passed a constant object/ reference of a const object is that mean that we cannot edit the attribute values of that object ?

or if its not whats the mean or constant in that is it 'refer' object' or 'attributes'

also when we return a constant object

declaring the function like

return_type function_name(parameters) const
{

}

the const keyword is at end of the function is it syntax ? and why if we return a const object shouldn't it be like follows

const return_type function_name(parameters) 
{

}

Sorry if its a noob question ;)

share|improve this question
    
Read this. It will help you. –  Björn Pollex Nov 14 '10 at 16:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This syntax:

return_type function_name(parameters) const
{

}

Indicates that function_name() may be invoked for an instance of the class that is const. It doesn't have any effect on the const-ness of the return value.

const return_type function_name(parameters)
{

}

...indicates that the value being returned from function_name() is const (and says nothing about the const-ness of the object having its member function called.)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks in what kind of scenarios that we should make the function 'constant' ? –  Sudantha Nov 14 '10 at 16:27
    
@Sundantha In scenarios where you want to invoke the method on a constant instance. From another viewpoint, all methods that don't change the objects state should be constant. –  Let_Me_Be Nov 14 '10 at 16:31

When we have passed a constant object/ reference of a const object is that mean that we cannot edit the attribute values of that object ?

Yes. If the function is const, then the function cannot modify any non-mutable fields on the class. (Or call any other non-const method on the class).

and why if we return a const object shouldn't it be like follows

Because the return type can be constant too. Consider the following:

#include <string>

class MyClass
{
    std::string data;
public:
    void SetData(const std::string& content)
    {
        data.assign(content);
    }
    const std::string& GetData() const //Note that the function is const, and so
    {                                  //is the reference it returns.
        return data;
    }
};

Note that we are returning a const reference to the internal member. If we returned a non const reference, than someone would be able to use the reference to modify the private member of the class, in this case MyClass::data.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks ! this was helpful ! –  Sudantha Nov 14 '10 at 16:28
    
+1 for better explanation –  John Dibling Nov 14 '10 at 16:33

Effectively the added const changes the first "hidden" parameter of the method from ClassType * const this to const ClassType * const this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.