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I am writing a basic web app, this has some list elements that I need to be able to click on the entire LI that surrounds each one to select the radio button held within, and only ensure the one I have clicked is selected. I can do this writing the code within the .click callback, however if I try to call the same code from a named function it falls down, I believe this is something to do with the "this" reference I am using, however I cannot seem to fix it.

The HTML is

<ul> 
  <form id="healthCheckAge" name="healthCheckAge"> 
    <li> <input type="radio" name="eighteen" value="18-30" />18-30 </li> 
    <li> <input type="radio" name="thirtyone" value="31-45" />31-45 </li> 
    <li> <input type="radio" name="fourtysix" value="46-65" />46-65 </li> 
    <li> <input type="radio" name="sixtyfive" value="65+" />65+</li> 
  </form> 
</ul> 

And the JavaScript is

function li_click(){
  //set the vars for the selectors
  var listInputs = $('#healthCheckAge li input');
  var clicked = listInputs.attr('name');
  //loop on all the li children to see if they match the clicked LI - if not ensure that they are unchecked and faded
  $(listInputs).each(function(index,Element){
    $(listInputs).attr('checked',false).parent().addClass('selected');
  });
  //set the radio button to checked and apply a style to it, while removing this from any other checked radio buttoon
  if($(listInputs).attr('name')==clicked){
    $(this).children().attr('checked','true').parent().removeClass('selected'); 
  } 
}

$('#healthCheckAge li').click(function(){
  li_click();                                 
});

I think the problem is that when I call the very last conditional statement the 'this' is not reflecting what I need.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using Firebug or Chrome dev tools? –  Alex Ford Nov 14 '10 at 17:01
    
I have been developing for iPad alone so have been using Safari, although I have chrome and this should work in there. I have been running JSLint for jquery in safari and the console complains that" no elements were found with the selector 'undefined'" which I dont get if I run the same code in the .click callback. Also if I run if($(listInputs).attr('name')==clicked){alert(this.nodeName) $(this).child‌​ren().attr('checked','true').parent().removeClass('selected'); } I get undefined on the node name - So i kinda need to find a way to make this be related to the conditional statement :/ –  user499846 Nov 14 '10 at 17:10
1  
The best way to avoid problems in situations where this will be needed throughout a complex function is to set a variable to the valye of this like var __this = $(this); –  Liam Bailey Nov 14 '10 at 17:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just pass the element to the function:

function lol(element){
  //set the vars for the selectors
  var listInputs = $('#healthCheckAge li input');
  var clicked = listInputs.attr('name');
  //loop on all the li children to see if they match the clicked LI - if not ensure that they are unchecked and faded
  $(listInputs).each(function(index,Element){
    $(listInputs).attr('checked',false).parent().addClass('selected');
  });
  //set the radio button to checked and apply a style to it, while removing this from any other checked radio buttoon
  if($(listInputs).attr('name')==clicked){
    $(element).children().attr('checked','true').parent().removeClass('selected'); 
  } 
}
  $('#healthCheckAge li').click(function(){
    lol(this);                                
  });

Inside the click handler, this refers to the element, but inside lol it points to the owner of the function, which is the global window object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I have been passing allsorts to this to try and solve it, completely didn't think to pass the click target as a var. Thanks!!! –  user499846 Nov 14 '10 at 17:21
    
@user499846, you could pass the element to the function, but see my answer below too. You can directly bind the "this" to what you want it to be. –  Ben Lee Nov 14 '10 at 17:25

You can bind the scope of lol() to the "this" that jQuery sets, using call, which is a method that is available to all functions:

$('#healthCheckAge li').click(function(){
    lol.call(this);                                
});

See https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/call

share|improve this answer

The simplest way would be to keep your function the way it is and do:

$('#healthCheckAge li').click( li_click );

Now this is the element that received the event, and you can still define the event parameter in the function if need be.

It is the exact equivalent of passing the function directly as the argument to the click() method.

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