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Watch the following example:

class A {
public:
    A(int param1, int param2, int param3) {
        // ...
    }
};

class B : public A {
public:
    B() : m_param1(1), m_param(2), m_param(3), A(m_param1, m_param2, m_param3) {
        // ...
    }
};

B b;

Obviously, when "b" will be created, A's ctor will be called before the parameters of B will be initialized.

This rule prevents me from creating "wrapper" classes which simplify the class's initialization.

What is the "right way" for doing it?

Thanks, Amir

PS: In my particular case, the parameters are not primitives, this example just helped me to explain myself.

share|improve this question
    
I understand the problem. However, this looks like you're duplicating information. Why would you be in a situation where you need to initialise both A and B with the same parameters? – Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '10 at 21:14
    
Specifically, I'm using the "Bullet" physics library, which takes pointers to objects as parameters. I want to create and store an object in the child class and pass it's pointer to the superclass. By that I can create a Character class which inherits from library's "physical object" class. – Amir Nov 14 '10 at 21:21
    
i'm not sure i'm getting the question, but remember one thing - statements in the initializing list do not execute in the order you give, they're executed in the order base classes and member variables are given in class declaration. – Janusz Lenar Nov 14 '10 at 21:41
    
...and that's why Moo-Juice's answer rox :] – Janusz Lenar Nov 14 '10 at 22:14
    
you can pass the base a pointer to a member of the child which has not yet been initialized, there's just not a lot you can do with that pointer prior to initialization (for instance, you can't cast it to a pointer to one of its base classes). 3.8/5 in the standard specifies this. – Steve Jessop Nov 14 '10 at 22:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

"The parameters are not primitives". So you have something like this?

class Param { /*...*/ };
class A {
public:
  A(const Param& param1, const Param& param2, const Param& param3);
};

class B : public A {
public:
  B();
private:
  Param m_param1;
  Param m_param2;
  Param m_param3;
};

And you want to pass the members of B to the constructor of A. How about this?

class B_params {
protected:
  B_params(int v1, int v2, int v3);
  Param m_param1;
  Param m_param2;
  Param m_param3;
};
class B : private B_params, public A {
public:
  B();
};

B_params::B_params(int v1, int v2, int v3)
  : m_param1(v1), m_param2(v2), m_param3(v3) {}
B::B() : B_params(1,2,3), A(m_param1, m_param2, m_param3) {}

Just make sure B_params comes before A in the list of B's inherited classes.

share|improve this answer
    
I've already knew this method, but I prefer not to use multiple inheritance. I'll probably use this method, because I can see any other solution besides that and "Factory" design pattern. I'll just wait a little longer to see if a better solution will come up. – Amir Nov 14 '10 at 21:35

Just call A's constructor:

class B : public A
{
public:
    B() : A(1 ,2, 3)
    {
    }; // eo ctor
}; // eo class B

EDIT:

Just read your comment to your original post. It's important to be clear about these things :) Anyway, this answer still holds true if you want to create new data in B, track it in B, and pass it to A:

class Object
{
private:
    int i;
public:
    Object(int _i) : i(_i){};
};

class A
{
public:
    A(Object* _1, Object* _2, Object* _3)
    {
    };
};

class B : public A
{
private:
    Object* _1;
    Object* _2;
    Object* _3;

public:
    B() : A(_1 = new Object(1), _2 = new Object(2), _3 = new Object(3))
    {
    };
};
share|improve this answer
    
are you sure B::_1 etc. won't be nullified after A(Object*,...) is called? – Janusz Lenar Nov 14 '10 at 21:44
    
There's no reason why it should, the object (at this point) has been allocated. I tested the above on VS2010 so cannot comment on other compilers. I don't see why it would be an issue. – Moo-Juice Nov 14 '10 at 21:47
    
think of B():_1(new Object(1)),_2(new Object(2)),_3(new Object(3)),A(_1,_2,_3){}. this will mess up because of actual executing order. actually, important it just works :] – Janusz Lenar Nov 14 '10 at 21:53
2  
Hm. If a member of POD type (which includes all pointers) is not listed in a constructor's mem-initializer list, that member is "not initialized". I guess that allows things like this which assign to them earlier than a mem-initializer would. (But if the member type is a class with constructor, this method won't work, of course.) – aschepler Nov 14 '10 at 22:18
1  
thank you, aschepler. it should be mentioned as long as std::auto_ptrs are perfectly reasonable to be used here. – Janusz Lenar Nov 14 '10 at 22:27

Not sure I'm getting your question.

If you just want something that helps you to initialize A with some given parameters, you should use an A constructor with default values:

class A {
public:
    A(int param1 = 1, int param2 = 2, int param3 =3) {
        // ...
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
No, A is a given class which I must simplify. – Amir Nov 14 '10 at 21:25

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