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I have stumbled upon a person changing mv command to -mv within a makefile target. What is the difference?

%/install-stamp:                                                                                                           
        dh_testdir                                                                                                         
        dh_testroot                                                                                                        
        dh_prep -p$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain                                                                                       
        cp -rl $(r) debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain                                                                     
        -mv debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/bin/libgcc_s_sjlj-1.dll debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/$(subst \
_,-,$(a))/bin                                                                                                              
        -mv debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/lib/libiberty.a debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/$(subst _,-,$(a)\
)/lib                                                                                                                      
        rm -f debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/share/man/man1/dllwrap*                                               
        rm -f debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/share/man/man7/fsf-funding*                                           
        rm -f debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/share/man/man7/gfdl*                                                  
        rm -f debian/$(subst _,-,$(a))-toolchain/usr/share/man/man7/gpl*                                                   
        touch $(@)       
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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Add a "-" before any command in a Makefile tells make to not quit if the command returns a non-zero status. Basically it's a "I don't care if it fails".

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Thanks! Now I need to figure out why the author decided to ignore the error! sigh –  Dima Nov 14 '10 at 21:46
1  
Looking at the snippet, it's probably so you can run that target more than once. On a second run, the file would have already been moved so it would error out before getting to the rm commands. –  JOTN Nov 14 '10 at 22:00

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