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So, I'm self-taught in the art of LaTeX, which means there are some really simple things that I just haven't ever figured out. One thing that I've always wanted to know was how to add to a sort of global preamble where I can add custom declarations and the like that will automatically be included when I render a document. Any thoughts?

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If you don't find an answer here, try the TeX/LaTeX Stack Exchange –  Michael Nov 14 '10 at 22:11
    
Can you give any examples as to what you want your custom declarations to do? –  nbz Nov 15 '10 at 13:40
    
Mostly custom commands and custom symbol declarations. –  Jason Hite Nov 15 '10 at 20:58

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You can create your own package to load with \usepackage. In it you can declare functions that you use commonly. If it is in the directory with your source it can be included directly, otherwise if you want to use it for all your documents, put in in your latex distibution folder and run texhash so that the compiler can find it.

Directions can be found in the LaTeX Wikibook or other places I'm sure. I also was a self taught LaTeXer and the Wikibook taught me most of what I needed, along with the short-math-guide and a few package manuals (especially for TikZ/PGF and Beamer).

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Also, putting files in a so-called local TEXMF tree will not need texhash or mktexlsr. And since the directory structure is confusing to newcomers: find a directory structure like {something with texmf}/tex/latex/, inside that make a directory "local" and put your files in there, i.e. texmf/tex/latex/local/mylocaldefinitions.sty –  Ulrich Schwarz Nov 15 '10 at 17:49

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