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My class has quite some properties and one of my constructors sets them all, I want the default constructor to call this other one and use the set properties. But I need to prepare arguments first, so calling it from the header won't help.

Here's what I'd like to do:

public class Test
{
    private int result, other;

        // The other constructor can be called from header,
        // but then the argument cannot be prepared.
        public Test() : this(0)
        {
        // Prepare arguments.
        int calculations = 1;

        // Call constructor with argument.
        this(calculations);

        // Do some other stuff.
        other = 2;
    }

    public Test(int number)
    {
        // Assign inner variables.
        result = number;
    }
}

So this is not possible, does anyone know how to call my constructor to set parameters inside code? Currently I'm storing a copy of the object from the other constructor and copying all the properties, it's really annoying.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes. just pass the value 1 in the first call

public class Test
{    
    private int result, other;
    public Test() : this(1)        
    {        
       // Do some other stuff.        
       other = 2;    
    }    
    public Test(int number)    
    {        
        // Assign inner variables.        
        result = number;    
    }

}

And why can't you prepare the argument?

public class Test
{    
    private int result, other;
    public Test() : this(PrepareArgument())
    {        
       // Do some other stuff.        
       other = 2;    
    }    
    public Test(int number)    
    {        
        // Assign inner variables.        
        result = number;    
    }
    private int PrepareArgument()
    {
         int argument;
         // whatever you want to do to prepare the argument
         return argument;
    }

}

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Din't think of putting the preperation in a seperate method, it's not ideal but it will work, thanks. –  MrFox Nov 14 '10 at 22:28
    
And depending on how complex it is, it could also be expressed inside the this() cpnstruction –  Charles Bretana Nov 14 '10 at 22:33
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Sounds like a little refactoring will help. While you can't do exactly what you want to do, there are always alternatives. I realize your actual code might be more complicated than the code you gave, so take this for an example refactoring of your problem. Extracting all common code into a new SetVariables method.

public class Test
{
    private int result, other;

        // The other constructor can be called from header,
        // but then the argument cannot be prepared.
        public Test() : this(0)
        {
        // Prepare arguments.
        int calculations = 1;

        // Call constructor with argument.
        SetVariables(calculations);

        // Do some other stuff.
        other = 2;
    }

    public Test(int number)
    {
        // Assign inner variables.
        SetVariables(number);
    }

    private void SetVariables(int number)
    {
        result = number;
    }
}
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If you want to call a constructor, but can't do it from the header, the only way is to define a private Initialize method. It appears you are doing "real work" in your constructor, which is not the task of a constructor. You should think of a different way to achieve your goal as your way severely prohibits debugging and others from reading your code.

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Why are we talking about headers and C# in the same topic? (not you so much as the OP) –  Ed S. Nov 14 '10 at 22:17
    
I meant the header of the constructor, ie. constructor chaining, and that should be the same he was talking about as well. –  Femaref Nov 14 '10 at 22:36
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