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I am writing an EF4 datalayer for an MVC 2 web application and I need suggestions on choosing inheritance vs. abstract base classes. My repository has worked well following the 'generic repo' structure but now I want to add "Audit" functionality which records everytime a CRUD operation is performed.

This is the contract I've been using so far:

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    void Create(T entity);
    void Update(T entity);
    void Delete(Func<T, bool> predicate);
    T Get(Func<T, bool> predicate);
    IQueryable<T> Query();
}

My repo. implementation looks like this:

sealed class EFRepository<TEntity> : IRepository<TEntity>
    where TEntity : EntityObject
{
    ObjectContext _context;
    ObjectSet<TEntity> _entitySet;

    public EFRepository(ObjectContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
        _entitySet = _context.CreateObjectSet<TEntity>();
    }

    public void Create(TEntity entity)
    {
        _entitySet.AddObject(entity);
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Update(TEntity entity)
    {
        _entitySet.UpdateObject(entity);
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Delete(Func<TEntity, bool> predicate)
    {
        TEntity entity = _entitySet.Single(predicate);
        _entitySet.DeleteObject(entity);
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public TEntity Get(Func<TEntity, bool> predicate)
    {
        return _entitySet.SingleOrDefault(predicate);
    }

    public IQueryable<TEntity> Query()
    {
        return _entitySet;
    }
}

I want to create the concept of an AuditableRepository<T>. Should I create it like this:

interface IAuditable<T>
interface IRepository<T>
AuditableRepository<T> : IRepository<T>, IAuditable<T>
EFRepository<T> : AuditableRepository<T>

or is it better to have it like this:

interface IAuditable<T>
interface IRepository<T>
EFRepository<T> : IRepository<T>, IAuditable<T>

or even:

interface IAuditable<T>
interface IRepository<T>
AuditableRepository<T> : IRepository<T>, IAuditable<T>
EFRepository<T> : IRepository<T>
AuditableEFRepository<T> : AuditableRepository<T>

Not all of my EFRepositories will need to be audited. How should I proceed?

share|improve this question
    
does the abstract base class provide any implementation at all? –  Russ Cam Nov 14 '10 at 23:03
    
@Russ Cam: No, I pasted it as it is. Should I remove it? I'm using a repository factory to create repos with Ninject injecting the appropriate database type (different physical databases). These repos then get injected into my MVC 2 controllers. –  John Nov 14 '10 at 23:08
2  
I don't think that the abstract class in it's current form is giving you anything additional over the interface. I think you could remove the abstract class. –  Russ Cam Nov 14 '10 at 23:16
    
@Russ Cam: That is a good point; I will remove it. –  John Nov 14 '10 at 23:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is another possibility (using a Decorator object to add additional functionality to an existing repository):

public sealed class Auditor<T> : IRepository<T>
{
    private readonly IRepository<T> _repository;

    public Auditor(IRepository<T> repository)
    {
        _repository = repository;    
    }

    public void Create(T entity)
    {
        //Auditing here...
        _repository.Create(entity);
    }

    //And so on for other methods...
}

The advantage to using a Decorator to add additional features is that it avoids the combinatorial explosion you began to see when you considered some repositories with auditing, some without, some using EF, some not. This gets progressively worse with every new feature that may or may not apply, often eventually devolving into configuration flags and messy internal branching.

share|improve this answer
    
Would EFRepository then inherit from Auditor<T>? How can I hide auditing details from EFRepository and have Auditing behavior happen 'behind the scenes' with the Decorator pattern you showed? –  John Nov 14 '10 at 23:09
    
@Smith, You would pass an instance of EFRepository into the Auditor. You would then use the Auditor for all of your access. The whole idea of the decorator is that it has no idea what it's decorating, other than that it follows some contract. It simply wraps existing logic with an additional feature. –  Dan Bryant Nov 14 '10 at 23:10

Neither feels like a perfect solution, as Dan says you might face a problem with different combinations of the interfaces. Audit features doesn't sound like it really needs to be part of the class either. I think rather than going with Dan's approach though that I'd declare and fire events in general on the repository. That way you could hook up lots of different things to it, much more flexible. So declare events like Created, Deleted etc.

In the future it also allows some really nice functionality through things like reactive extensions.

share|improve this answer
    
Hooked events are a good solution for this problem. That said, some care has to be taken when you expose events in the data layer. Things can quickly get out of hand when a single Update call in the data layer results in a whole chain of complex events, unintentionally percolating back through Remoting boundaries, because Jim's module receives events fired by Tom's module that received an update from Alice because she decided to take action on Created. –  Dan Bryant Nov 14 '10 at 23:24
    
Yeah agree, events are the right mechanics to use probably but how to use them is still a design question that needs some careful thought, especially when it comes to side-effects –  konrad Nov 14 '10 at 23:31
    
I think the key to using events safely in the data layer is to make sure that they are isolated to the data layer (i.e. no public visibility and no public side effects). This allows you to code in a reactive style (possibility even using Rx), but greatly reduces the odds of race condition nightmares. –  Dan Bryant Nov 14 '10 at 23:44

First of all, if your Repository<T> doesn't have any common functionality (you only have abstract methods and no implementation there), the first thing I would do is get rid of it. It is best that all other parts of your program access the repository through the IRepository<T> interface only, that will give you greater freedom later.

Second thing, having an EFRepository class implies that you want to leave an option to switch to a different ORM one day. My opinion is - don't do it. If you chose EF, stick to EF. If you really think this is an option, at least create a separate assembly with a namespace MyApp.EntityORM or whatever, put all your Repository classes there and get rid of the EF prefix. Then, if it ever comes to that, you can perhaps load the right ORM through dependency injection some day, without changing the rest of your code.

From my experience: there can be subtle differences between ORM's which prevent you from interchanging them in a truly transparent way, and there is little chance you will need to ever change your ORM for a single project.

Second thing, I also prefer wrapping base functionality of a base repository in a different class (the Decorator pattern as Dan Bryant already said), as opposed to overriding an already existing class. The reason is that overriding often leads to having to deal with internals of the base class, and this can sometimes get a bit messy.

From your question, it is not completely clear how an "auditable repository" should behave, but if it is just a plain IRepository<T> (it audits all methods implemented in a IRepository<T>), then you don't need a separate interface:

interface IRepository<T>
class Repository<T> : IRepository<T>
class AuditableRepository<T> : IRepository<T>

Adding to what Dan said, you could have a factory method which would create the appropriate wrapper:

class AuditableRepository<T> : IRepository<T>
{
     public static IRepository<T> CreateFrom(IRepository<T> baseRepo)
     { 
          // wrap base repo in an auditable repository
          // and return it
          return new AuditableRepository<T>(baseRepo);
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In general the recommendation (from the framework design guidelines) is to use abstract classes rather than interfaces for inheritance. Interfaces will give you more freedom for sure but if people depend on your interfaces you can't add methods later to your interface without breaking their implementation. Also you might want to have some default methods in your abstract class. Interfaces is more appropriate most often when you only have some small common subset of methods that are applicable to a wide array of wholy different classes –  konrad Nov 14 '10 at 23:33
    
@MattiasK: that is true, although there are still ways to go around this: you create another interface and have it contain the old one, as well as some new methods. This way you can add the methods only to those classes which need the functionality. Also, introduction of extension methods also changed things a bit in favor of interfaces. –  Groo Nov 14 '10 at 23:37
    
@Groo: I removed Repository<T> per your and Russ Cam's advice. Thank you. I'm still reading through all the suggestions in this thread now! –  John Nov 14 '10 at 23:42
    
I dunno, extensions methods always felt a bit iffy in some cases for being a bit hard for clarity and new developers of your code. Using it for extending classes in that way seems a bit troublesome –  konrad Nov 14 '10 at 23:47
    
@MattiasK, my take on adding new methods: either (a) they are purely helper methods (using existing features) and therefore can be naturally expressed as extension methods or (b) they are new core features of the class and thus it's questionable whether existing derived classes can be trusted to still work as intended. If you have an IWalker that knows how to Walk, you wouldn't expect to be able to make it Run without some work. You could take a Walker and teach him how to Run, but if his Walk is abstract, his default Run could only be a Walk in disguise. –  Dan Bryant Nov 15 '10 at 0:01

Will it matter whether a repository is auditable or not? Meaning, do you need to know if a repository is an IAuditableRepository or just an IRepository? If not, you could use DI and add a constructor that takes an IAuditor. Then in your repository methods, if an IAuditor is available, you can use it.

sealed class EFRepository<TEntity> : Repository<TEntity>
    where TEntity : EntityObject
{
    ObjectContext _context;
    ObjectSet<TEntity> _entitySet;
    IAuditor _auditor;

    public EFRepository(ObjectContext context) : this(context, null)
    {
    }
    public EFRepository(ObjectContext context, IAuditor auditor)
    {
        _context = context;
        _entitySet = _context.CreateObjectSet<TEntity>();
        _auditor = auditor; 
    }
    public override void Create(TEntity entity)
    {
        _entitySet.AddObject(entity);
        _context.SaveChanges();

        if (_auditor != null)
        {
            // audit
        }
    }

    // etc.
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is preferable to creating new derived composite types, but can become untenable as the number of 'add-on' features grows. –  Dan Bryant Nov 14 '10 at 23:47

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