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This is more of an opinion question. I do freelance webdesign for locals who need a website, and I often like to use Javascript and Jquery plugins/programs/libraries/frameworks or what you want to call them. One of them, for example, is iui. It let's you manipulate a webpage so it moves and scrolls like an iphone app.

My question is, If I use this plugin, or some other plugin, in designing someone's website, am I allowed to charge them? Is it unethical? I know creative commons license lets me use and adapt the code, as long as the license and copyright information stays intact, but what are the rules on charging people for a website that uses this code. I'm certainly not selling the code for profit, but I am using it to create something that I'm selling for profit. And furthermore, if I go about borrwing parts of various code, at what point does it become my own?

I'm always wary about using other sites for inspiration in this way. For example, even using certain individual php or cgi or javascript functions found in tutorials and stuff. Why reinvent the wheel? You know? What do you guys think?

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closed as off-topic by JasonMArcher, Jeffrey Bosboom, Raphael Miedl, Pang, jim mcnamara May 29 at 1:43

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I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is asking for legal advice. –  JasonMArcher May 28 at 22:05
    
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about licensing / copyright / intellectual properties / legal issues, not programming or software development. See the help center for more. –  Pang May 29 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

The answer is that it depends on the license under which the code is released. Some licenses allow re-use for non-commercial purposes (e.g. your personal website), but you couldn't use it in a commercial website or one that you charged for. Other licenses allow for unrestricted commercial use so long as the copyright notice is maintained and/or use of the code is acknowledged. The best I can suggest is that you educate yourself on the major licenses (BSD, Apache, MIT, GPL, LGPL, ...) and check the license on any piece of code (or artwork, font, ...) before you use it.

http://www.opensource.org/licenses/index.html

If the license is not clear or only allows for non-commercial use, you can always contact the author for permission to use the code. He/she might charge a nominal fee or might just grant you use for free under certain conditions. It all depends on the author.

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This is why I prefer to reinvent the wheel when doing this kind of work.
The honest answer is I don't know. I wouldn't really have any qualms about doing it, but on the other hand if I were the creator of the plugin I would have issues with people using it as part of work they sell.
I'm inclined to advise playing it safe, and writing code yourself if you plan to sell it.

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I would tend to agree, but the question is, at what point does it stop? If we followed that logic, we would have to rewrite entire PERL libraries. We would have to rewrite sorting algorithms everytime we need to sort a list instead of using sort(array a) or whatever. When would the madness stop!?!?!? –  Atey1 Nov 15 '10 at 3:30
    
I disagree. Much code is released with fairly liberal license that allows for commercial use. Use that or check with the original author whether use is permitted before you go reinventing the wheel. –  James Kovacs Nov 15 '10 at 3:33

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