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I have a dict with following structure:

{5:"djdj", 6:"8899", 7:"998kdj"}

The key is int typed and it's not sorted.

Now I want all the elements whose key is >= 6.

Is there easy way to do that?

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Do you want a list where all of the values have a key in the dict greater-than-or-equal-to 6? Or do you want a dict where the there are no keys lower than 6? –  Johnsyweb Nov 15 '10 at 5:13

8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

[v for k,v in mydict.items() if k >= 6]

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A good, concise answer. –  Chris Morgan Nov 15 '10 at 4:58
    
Is it legal: {k,v for k,v in mydict.items() if k >= 6} –  Bin Chen Nov 15 '10 at 5:41
    
@Bin Chen: they're adding that syntax (using : rather than , ) in Python 3, but for now, no. python.org/dev/peps/pep-0274 –  bukzor Nov 15 '10 at 5:49

What do you mean by "elements"?

If you want a dict of key-value pairs with keys ≥6, Python 2.7+ and 3.x support dict comprehensions.

{ k: v for k, v in mydict.items() if k >= 6 }

You can get this in earlier versions of Python

dict( (k, v) for k, v in mydict.items() if k >= 6 )  # Python 2.4+
dict([(k, v) for k, v in mydict.items() if k >= 6])  # Python 2.0+

by using expression generators or list comprehensions.

If you want a list of keys only,

[ k for k in mydict.keys() if k >= 6 ]
filter( lambda k: k >= 6, mydict.keys() )

Similarly, if you want a list of values only,

[ v for k, v in mydict.items() if k >= 6 ]
[ mydict[k] for k in mydict.keys() if k >= 6 ]
map( mydict.get, filter( lambda k: k >= 6, mydict.keys() ) )
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1  
You meant if, not where, in your list comprehensions. –  Chris Morgan Nov 15 '10 at 4:57
1  
D'oh. Obviously. Too much SQL lately... –  ephemient Nov 15 '10 at 5:11

It can be done with filter too.

In [9]: data = {5:"djdj", 6:"8899", 7:"998kdj"}

In [10]: dict(filter(lambda x: x[0] > 5, data.items()))
Out[10]: {6: '8899', 7: '998kdj'}
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[ mydict[k] for k in filter(lambda x : x > 6, mydict) ]
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1  
yuck, why not in mydict if k > 6 instead of using filter? –  John La Rooy Nov 15 '10 at 5:22

If you know the largest key and have no missing keys you can also just go through the dictonary directly: [mydict[x] for x in range(6, largest_key+1)]. That would be the most efficient way.

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1  
@bukzor: Then you have a lot of missing keys, so this doesn't apply. On the other hand, consider a dict with 10^9 entries where you want x < 100 - that only takes 100 lookups, instead of 10^9 comparisons. –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 15 '10 at 15:41

You can use a list comprehension:

mydict = {5:"djdj", 6:"8899", 7:"998kdj"}
print [k for k in mydict if k >= 6]  # prints "[6, 7]"
print dict([(k, mydict[k]) for k in mydict if k >= 6])  # prints "{6:"8899", 7:"998kdj"}"
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In Python 3, you can do dictionary comprehension, so the dict([(k, mydict[k]) for k in mydict if k >= 6]) could become {k: mydict[k] for k in mydict if k >= 6]). Probably not helpful for this case, but cool nonetheless :-) –  Chris Morgan Nov 15 '10 at 4:29

List comprehension seems to be what you seek but with a list of elements as opposed to keys:

a = {5:"djdj", 6:"8899", 7:"998kdj"}
[a[elem] for elem in a if elem >= 6]  #should give you "['8866', '998kd']"
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To get a dictionary right away: (works in both python 2 and 3)

dict( (k,v) for k,v in mydict.items() if k >= 6 )
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