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My goal is to gather input and open files based on that input.

FILE* 
open_input_file (char* fileName) //opens source file to be read
{ 
 return fopen(fileName, "r");
}

In an earlier function, I collect input from the user and save it to fileName. When I debug the program, it tells me fopen is returning NULL. That's not what I want, and I'm not sure where the problem is.

int main(void)
{    FILE* inFile = NULL;
     char infileName[32] = {'\0'};
     gather_input(infileName); // infileName is an output parameter for this
     inFile = open_input_file(infileName);
}

I don't know what the problem is. Any thoughts?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If fopen returns NULL, the open failed. errno will hold the failure code and strerror(errno) will return a short description of why the open failed.

#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

...

int main(void)
{    FILE* inFile = NULL;
     char infileName[32] = {'\0'};
     gather_input(infileName); // infileName is an output parameter for this
     if (!(inFile = open_input_file(infileName))) {
         fprintf(stderr, "Error opening '%s': %s\n", 
                 infileName, strerror(errno));
     } else {
         // open successful
         ...
     }
}

Off-topic

gather_input better make sure infileName is null-terminated to prevent buffer overflows. The simplest way to do this is to define the size of the file name buffer as a macro and set the last character to 0.

#define FILENAMELEN 32
void gather_input(char infileName[]) {
    ...
    infileName[FILENAMELEN-1]=0;
}

 int main(void)
{    FILE* inFile = NULL;
     char infileName[FILENAMELEN] = {'\0'};

This isn't very flexible. You could instead pass the size of the file name buffer into gather_input.

#define LENGTH(a) (sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]))
void gather_input(char infileName[], size_t len) {
    ...
    infileName[len-1]=0;
}

 int main(void)
{    FILE* inFile = NULL;
     char infileName[32] = {'\0'};
     gather_input(infileName, LENGTH(infileName)); // infileName is an output parameter for this

An alternative to setting the last character, if using standard string manipulation functions, is to use the strl* functions (strlcpy and strlcat) rather than their unbounded cousins. If you aren't using strl*, you should be using strncpy and strncat.

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I just added an error check in the gather_input function to ensure infileName is null-terminated. That didn't seem to solve the problem. I also added your code (#included errno.h and added the if statement), but I'm not quite sure what's going on there. Where is the error message supposed to print? –  Nate Nov 15 '10 at 6:22
    
The null-termination thing has less to do with the problem you're facing and more to do with preventing buffer overflows (see updated answer). RE: where. If you're running this from a command line, in the terminal. If you're running this from a debugger, in the console. –  outis Nov 15 '10 at 6:30
    
What does that mean, in the terminal, or in the console? For some reason when I debug, the program skips over the if statement from your code. I posted the code on pastebin (pastebin.com/Qbrh1v4A). While I don't think I omitted anything important, there's a chance I did. You can glance at it if you'd like, and I would appreciate it, but I definitely understand if you don't want to. –  Nate Nov 15 '10 at 6:42
    
The terminal is wherever you type commands. The console is where the debugger displays text output; how you view it depends on what IDE you're using. I'll at least compile the code and see if I can step through it; that shouldn't take long. –  outis Nov 15 '10 at 6:47
    
One problem with your null-termination is you use strlen, which only works on strings that are properly null-terminated. Also, the GUARD macro in your header could theoretically conflict with some other macro. The standard is to use "<header>_H" (MORSE_H, in this case). Thirdly, if open_input_file fails, you shouldn't proceed with processing. Notice the else block in my sample; that's where the input file should be processed. –  outis Nov 15 '10 at 6:51
  1. Have you checked that the file pointed to by inFilename exists on your HDD ?

  2. Check the value of infileName in your debugger or put a printf statement to show the value on screen. printf("'%s'\n", infileName);

  3. Did you call fclose() on your file inside the open_input_file() call. Maybe the file is still locked ?

Edit: I just checked the code. I have modified your english_to_morse() function. 1. The while statement is easier to follow than the for. 2. fgetc() returns an int and not a char.

At the top of the initialise I added this. This initialises every string in the array with and undefined string of ".??.". This will make it easier to find strange bugs as everything in your array is at least initialised.

I have modified different sections of the code but you should be able to follow.

    initialize_morse_alphanum (char morseStrings[91][6])
    {   
        for (int i=0;i<91;i++)
            strcpy(morseStrings[i], ".??.");

        ....
        ....



    void 
    english_to_morse(FILE* inputFile, FILE* outputFile, char morseStrings[91][6])
    {   int convert;

        convert = fgetc(inputFile);
        while (convert != EOF)
        {   
            fputs(morseStrings[convert], outputFile);
            fputc(' ', outputFile);
            printf ("%s ", morseStrings[convert]);
            convert = fgetc(inputFile);
        }
    }


open_output_file (char* fileName)  //opens destination file to be written
{   FILE* handle = NULL;
    handle = fopen (fileName, "w");    <---- Remove the * from filename
    return handle; }

Also, as mentioned in a different answer, it would be good to add some bounds checks to different areas of the code. At the moment it is quite prone to crashing. If my input file contains a lowercase 'a' (ascii 96) your program will be accessing memory that is out of bounds. So you should add a line like if (convert >= '0' && convert <= 'Z') in there somewhere. I will let you work that out.

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1. yes. 2. just implemented that, and it displayed the expected value. 3. no. I call fclose() in main() after open_input_file() (although, it never gets to that point before encountering a run-time error) –  Nate Nov 15 '10 at 6:12
    
open_output_file (char* fileName) //opens destination file to be written { FILE* handle = NULL; handle = fopen (*fileName, "w"); return handle; } You need change the middle line to handle = fopen(filename, "w"); / ie. remove the * –  Andrew Cash Nov 15 '10 at 7:10
    
I would also recommend that a good practice to follow is that you write one function at a time, compile and then test it fully before starting to write the next function. This way you find bugs as you go. In this case there were small errors in different areas of your program and it made testing and debugging more difficult. This is something you learn to do well over time but is a good habit to get into now. –  Andrew Cash Nov 15 '10 at 7:37
    
That probably would have saved me quite a bit of time today. –  Nate Nov 15 '10 at 7:43
    
Thanks a lot by the way. I'm going to implement the error-checking you recommended –  Nate Nov 15 '10 at 7:47

Make sure that gather_input works properly. Could it be a problem because you're trying to read a file you're also writing on? In this case, try to close and open again the stream.

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I don't think gather_input is the problem. What do you mean I'm trying to read a file I'm writing in? When am I writing in that file? –  Nate Nov 15 '10 at 6:25

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