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I cloned my repository with:

git clone ssh://xxxxx/xx.git 

but after I changed some files and add and commit them I want to push them to server:

git add xxx.php
git commit -m "TEST"
git push origin master

But the error I get back is:

error: src refspec master does not match any.  
error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://xxxxx.com/project.git'
share|improve this question
1  
@Marco that question has a lot of noise. This one got to the root of the answer quickly. It's more concise, so it gets my vote. –  weberc2 Feb 8 '13 at 3:38
    
Possibly related to Push origin master error on new repository. –  Cupcake Jul 3 '13 at 16:34
3  
@Marco That's not a duplicate. That one is a very specific issue about pushing a local branch to a remote branch. This one is about initializing a repo and pushing it up. They produce the same error, but the REASONS they produce that error and the fixes are entirely different. Also, sinoohe, you should accept an answer. Probably the first one, seeing as it answers the question and has helped over 350 people. –  tandrewnichols Jul 8 '13 at 0:42
    
@tandrewnichols Good point, thanks for your explanation. –  Marco Jul 10 '13 at 14:30
    
Did you set up your git config commands to install and configure git globally on your machine? –  Igor Ganapolsky Nov 4 '13 at 1:18

25 Answers 25

Maybe you just need to commit. I ran into this when I did:

mkdir repo && cd repo
git remote add origin /path/to/origin.git
git add .

Oops! Never committed!

git push -u origin master
error: src refspec master does not match any.

All I had to do was:

git commit -m 'initial commit'
git push origin master

Success!

share|improve this answer
12  
Don't just follow this step blindly, look at what @Vi has mentioned, and then modify your push command to correct ref. –  Kumar Jun 7 '12 at 16:43
    
Damn, happened to me as well. Been using XCode for Git for too long and took it for granted that you need to commit before pushing. –  Ben Mar 27 '13 at 18:57
1  
I had the same problem, just forgot to commit before push. This fixed the issue, thanks! –  Shimon Tolts Jul 4 at 13:37
  1. Try git show-ref to see what refs do you have. Is there refs/heads/master?

  2. You can try git push origin HEAD:master as more local-reference-independent solution.

share|improve this answer
1  
my master branch wasn't on top of commits ! so i created a branch that it was at the end of all branchs and i pushed them to the server: –  sinoohe Nov 17 '10 at 4:26
3  
git checkout -b testbranch ; git push origin testbranch:master –  sinoohe Nov 17 '10 at 4:27
6  
git show-ref showed my branch; the git push origin HEAD:<branch> worked for me. –  Glen Solsberry Nov 25 '11 at 22:01
2  
You just saved me Vi. Thank you for git push origin HEAD:master. But why something like git push --force origin master does not work? –  shkschneider Jul 17 '12 at 14:09
1  
@gms8994 -- you're correct. if someone creates a branch as a first thing instead of pushing into master, the same unfriendly error shows up. use git push origin <branch> instead of master in case you attempt to git checkout -b <branch> before any FIRST push after initial git remote add origin <url> –  asyncwait Jul 6 '13 at 20:33

I also had a similar error after deleting all files in my local computer and I have to cleanup all files on the repository.

My error message was something like this:

error: src refspec master does not match any.
error: failed to push some refs to 'git@github ... .git'

and it solved by executing the following commands:

touch README
git add README

git add (all other files)
git commit -m 'reinitialized files'
git push origin master --force

That's it, hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
4  
The other answers did not solve the problem I was having (for instance, I had already committed and still had this error), but doing a git push origin BRANCH --force worked. Thank you! –  Lemmings19 Mar 5 '13 at 1:35
    
See this earlier answer. I suspect that you needed to add a file because git won't track empty directories. –  Cupcake Apr 4 at 20:57
    
It certainly helped. Thanks. –  Himanshu Yadav Jul 8 at 15:03
  1. My changes were already committed
  2. Force push still gave me the same error.

So I tried Vi's solution:

git push origin HEAD:<remoteBranch> 

This worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Same here, would love to know why this was the case. Thanks for this solution to you and Vi. –  Elijah Lynn Jan 9 at 22:29
2  
I finally found out that it was because I misspelled the branch name. I successfully pushed branch A to origin with a branch named B with git push origin HEAD:B, but I still got the same error every time when I push with git push origin on branch A. –  Yi Huang Feb 17 at 16:39
    
I removed my downvote, I'm sorry about my response earlier. Have a nice day! :D –  Cupcake May 12 at 15:42
    
@YiHuang, ugh thanks, I checked my branch name before, and then I checked it again because of your comment - had the same issue, missplelled it. –  lakesare Dec 18 at 19:31

Missing or skipping git add . or git commit may cause this error:

git push -u origin master
Username for 'https://github.com': yourusername
Password for 'https://yourusername@github.com': 
error: src refspec master does not match any.
error: failed to push some refs to 'https://github.com/yourusername/foobar.git'

To fix it, reinitialize and follow the proper sequence:

git init
git add .
git commit -m 'message'
git *create remote
git push -u origin master
share|improve this answer
2  
git: '*create' is not a git command. See 'git --help'. –  sam Jul 16 at 17:33
    
that's correct, the business end is more specifically git remote add __REMOTE_NAME__ __URL_OR_SSH__, and above the remote name is "origin" –  aug2uag Jul 17 at 18:32

I found this happened in a brand new repository after I git added only a directory.

As soon as I added a file (e.g. a README), git push worked great.

share|improve this answer
    
This probably works because git doesn't actually track directories, only files. So if a directory is empty, git won't actually add it. –  Cupcake Apr 4 at 20:51

This happens too when you are in a specific branch and try to push another that do not exist yet, like:

$ git branch
* version-x  # you are in this branch
  version-y

$ git push -u origin master
error: src refspec master does not match any.
error: failed to push some refs to 'origin_address'
share|improve this answer
2  
LOL. I was trying to push to origin master but that branch didn't exist. It was called origin stable. –  penner May 27 '13 at 23:35
    
@penner same here. thanks for the idea. –  dmtri.com Feb 18 at 9:55

This just mean you forgot to do the initial commit, try

git add .
git commit -m 'initial commit'
git push origin master
share|improve this answer

For me I had to make sure the public key is properly configured in the server, in ~/.ssh/authorized_keys, & in bitbucket (if you are using that) ie they need to match.

Then:

git add --all

git commit -m 'message'

git push -u origin master

Worked for me in the end.

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This happens when you have added your file, forgot to commit and pushing. So commit the files and then push.

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I think its because you pushed an invalid branch. Generally because the repository does not have common master branch(maybe development branch). You can use git branch to see branches.

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This will also happen if you have a typo in the branch name you're trying to push.

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1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  digitalextremist Apr 4 at 21:06
    
This should have been a comment, sry. –  davidkonrad Apr 4 at 21:29
1  
I had the same error message from git, and this was the solution., so it IS an answer to the question. Apparently this has helped a few people out, since a few people have upvoted it. –  Gavin Apr 5 at 15:25
    
I suspect a great many of us who came here via web search actually mistyped the name! –  sage Jun 23 at 2:49

You need to config your git if is the first time that you use it with:

git config --global user.email "you@example.com"

git config --global user.name "Your Name"
share|improve this answer

This worked for me resetting to remote master the repo

git checkout master
git commit -a -m "your comment"
git push origin master
share|improve this answer
    
git commit -a -m "your comment" git push origin master did it for me, thanks –  CamHart Sep 22 at 20:56

If you want to create new branch remotely in the origin, you need to create the same branch locally first:

$ git clone -b new-branch
$ git push origin new-branch
share|improve this answer

Same error, I had a typo:

git checkout -b UnitTests
git add .
git commit -m 'doing work'

Then:

git push origin UnitTest #missing the s
error: src refspec UnitTest does not match any.

fixed typo and it worked.

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Old topic, but I had this issue and wanted to share my experience. I had already created a commit.

Make sure you are pushing to the right branch

I was typing git push origin master but when I typed git branch I was on a v1 branch, so I had to type git push origin v1

share|improve this answer
    
If you want to push your current branch, an easy way to do it is to simply do git push origin HEAD, or git push origin @ if you're using a recent version of Git, or git push origin head if you're using Windows or OS X. –  Cupcake Jun 17 at 16:59
    
I came across this issue when I forgot that I renamed the master branch –  RobotEyes Dec 17 at 17:27

None of the above solutions worked for me when I got the src-refspec error. My workflow:

  • pushed to remote branch (same local branch name)
  • deleted that remote branch
  • changed some stuff & committed
  • pushed again to the same remote branch name (same local branch name)
  • got src-refspec error.

Fixed error by simply making a new branch, and pushing again. (Weird thing was, I couldn't simply just rename the branch - gave me fatal: Branch rename failed)

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I was contributing to one github repo so I forked the project, cloned it, created my own branch, did some commits and tried to push. At this point I discovered that I cloned not my fork but the original project repo (which I don't have permission to push).

So I changed the .git/config to point origin to my repo.

at this point when I tried to push I was getting error error: src refspec my_awesome_branch does not match any.

All I had to do is to touch any file and commit it (similar like you see it in this answer

git touch README
git commit -m "fixing error in my git repo"

and than:

git checkout master
git pull origin master
git push origin master # this will tell my remote repo about my new branch
git checkout my_awesome_branch
git push origin my_awesome_branch # now it will work
share|improve this answer

I had a similar error. But git tells me:

*** Please tell me who you are.

Run

git config --global user.email "you@example.com"
git config --global user.name "Your Name"

Or to set your account's default identity.

Omit --global to set the identity only in this repository.

Then the error goes away.

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I just got this error while trying to push stuff into a new repo on GitHub. I had created the git repo locally, plus I had created the repo on GitHub using the Web GUI (including a LICENSE file).

The problem went away after I pulled the LICENSE file from the otherwise empty GitHub repo into my local repo. After that, I could push with no problems.

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I also received this problem but it was because I accidentally shut down my server before doing the push. This too will cause the same error.

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My issue was that the 'master' branch hadn't been created locally yet.

A quick

git checkout -b "master" 

created the master branch, at which point, a quick:

git push -u origin master

Pushed the work up to the git repo.

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This just happened to me. Something in my env was off (I think due to a borked rebase, but I'm not sure). Closing my terminal (OSX 10.8.3 / Zsh) and opening a new one fixed it. Always try turning it off and on again!

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@Aryo In my case I had to use the full url of my local git repository to push the file. First I removed all the files in current directory. Created README added it. Added some more. Then I commited those files and at last pushed them giving proper url to the repository. Here yourrepository is the name of the repository in the server.

rm -rf *

touch README
git add README
touch file1 file2
git add file1 file2

git commit -m "reinitialized files"
git push git@localhost:yourrepository.git master --force
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is not helpful... –  cept0 Oct 5 '12 at 13:06
    
Why did you need to use the full URL for your remote instead of just setting up an alias for it with git remote add origin <url>? –  Cupcake Apr 4 at 20:53

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