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With respect to coding standards, speed, and efficiency, which of the following is a better programming practice for this situation?

function foo() {
  if(bar)   { return 0; }
  if(baz)   { return 0; }
  if(qux)   { return 0; }
}

or

function foo() {
  if(bar || baz || qux) { return 0; }
}

I'd lean toward the first, since only one condition has to be evaluated and therefore would be faster, but having the multiple returns is not good...?

//EDIT

The languages I'd be applying this to are mainly PHP and Javascript, possibly C++ and Ruby.

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What should your method return if bar || baz || qux is false? –  Mark Byers Nov 15 '10 at 7:30
    
@Mark - It's actually from a larger context so I removed the other stuff for brevity. Thanks for the reminder though. –  Steve Nov 15 '10 at 7:47
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Almost every single programming language today uses short-circuit evaluation for ||, which means the two examples will be equivalent in terms of control flow and thus performance.

Having multiple returns should indeed be avoided if they are spread all over the function and they return different things, because this decreases readability. On the other hand, it's fairly standard to have early-out conditions that detect inacceptable conditions and stop the execution flow:

function getFriendList() 
{
  if (! has_internet_connection() ) return null;
  if (! is_logged_in() ) return null;

  return server.getFriendList();
}
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Regarding your second example the || is short-circuiting in most languages so only the necessary conditions will be evaluated. For example if bar evaluates to true, neither baz nor qux will be evaluated.

Knowing this, I would probably choose the second example.

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1  
+1 short circuiting –  Steve Nov 15 '10 at 7:26
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The latter but as:

function foo()
{

   var result = 1;

   if(bar || baz || quz)
   {
       result = 0;
   }

   return result;
}

Exiting your code willy-nilly with "return" is bad practice and makes debugging a nightmare - especially if it is someone elses code you are trying to debug! Flow of control should always exit at the bottom of the function!

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+1 for coding standards tip and return variable –  Steve Nov 15 '10 at 7:28
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In C# you can use the second version because is the same regarding performance but looks nicer. If bar is true then the other flags are no longer checked.

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In the second case since you are using logical-OR the second conditions are checked only if it is necessary,so wrt better coding standards I would like to go with second one.

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The latter example is better in my opinion in terms of coding. In an OR statement, atmost one condition is true the statement is true. So if the first condition is true, no further conditions will be looked at. There is no loss in speed or efficiency.

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It depends entirely upon the language. Many languages will short-circuit evaluations so that, if bar is true, the other two are not evaluated, and any half-decent compiler will optimise those to the same thing in that case. Of the four languages you mentioned (C++, Ruby, PHP and Javascript), they all do short circuit evaluations.

And, despite what the "avoid multiple returns" crowd will tell you, that's not a rule you should follow like a sheep. It's meant to avoid situations where it's hard to see where returns (or loop breaks) are happening. Your first solution does not suffer from that problem any more than your second.

Blind following of dogma without understanding the reasons behind it should be an offence punishable by painful torture.

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I'd probably be on the waterboard 24/7 then...but thanks for the advice. Rob's return variable solves the "hard to see returns" situation, I assume? –  Steve Nov 15 '10 at 7:31
    
Yes, but I don't think it's necessary myself since the original code was fine. Rob's answer addressed another aspect which was a code path that returned nothing but I had assumed this was just a snippet and you realised that was a bad idea (in any case, that's something the compiler/interpreter should catch). I actually prefer the original solution to Rob's since his looks messy to me but that's a personal preference only - it does still work. –  paxdiablo Nov 15 '10 at 7:38
    
OK thanks @pax (+1) and others. I'm going with @Victor as a good summation and also since he has significantly less rep than 80k. :p –  Steve Nov 15 '10 at 7:43
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