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I'm trying to sort an XML document using XSLT, and want to keep the comments. So far so good, since there are some answers to this question already (see related..). But! none of these (excellent) answers relate to an XML that looks like this:

<xml>
    <beatles>
        <!-- comment(1): john is actually my favourite -->
        <!-- comment(2): John died tragically in 1980 -->
        <beatle name="John"/>

        <beatle name="Ringo"/>

        <beatle name="George"/>

        <!-- comment(1): Paul still does live concerts to this day -->
        <!-- comment(2): contrary to common folklore, Paul is NOT dead! -->
        <beatle name="Paul"/>
    </beatles>
</xml>

What happens now? I want to sort the Beatles (God bless them) by name, and also keep ALL the comments of each Beatle in place, in order to get this result:

<xml>
    <beatles>
        <beatle name="George"/>

        <!-- comment(1): john is actually my favourite -->
        <!-- comment(2): John died tragically in 1980 -->
        <beatle name="John"/>

        <!-- comment(1): Paul still does live concerts to this day -->
        <!-- comment(2): contrary to common folklore, Paul is NOT dead! -->
        <beatle name="Paul"/>

        <beatle name="Ringo"/>
    </beatles>
</xml>

Good old preceding-sibling::comment()[1] won't work here. In regular code I'd just do a reverse loop over all the preceding comments, and stop when I hit a non-comment node; but as we all know, XSLT's for-each cannot be escaped.

Any thoughts?

TIA!

DF.

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Good question, +1. I think @Tim-C has given you the perfect answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 15 '10 at 13:12

2 Answers 2

I think this can be achieved by means of a key which lists all comments for a given 'beatle' element.

<xsl:key name="comments" match="comment()" use="following-sibling::beatle[1]/@name" />

So, for each comment, it is indexed by the first successive beatle element.

You can then use this as follows to list all comments for any beatle element.

<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
   <xsl:output method="xml"/>

   <xsl:key name="comments" match="comment()" use="following-sibling::beatle[1]/@name" />

   <xsl:template match="/xml/beatles">
      <beatles>
         <xsl:for-each select="beatle">
            <xsl:sort select="@name" />

            <!-- Loop through all comments for the beatle element -->
            <xsl:for-each select="key('comments', @name)">
               <xsl:comment>
                  <xsl:value-of select="." />
               </xsl:comment>
            </xsl:for-each>

            <!-- Copy the beatle element -->
            <xsl:copy>
               <xsl:copy-of select="@*" />
            </xsl:copy>
         </xsl:for-each>
      </beatles>
   </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
IMO using keys for such a simple task is an overkill. BTW when using imperative-style XSLT you get tighter coupling and modifications of such code get harder and harder with time. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Nov 15 '10 at 9:16
    
+1 for a perfect answer! –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 15 '10 at 13:09
    
@Alex-Nikolaenkov: Keys are the right instrument for the right situation -- and this situation is the right one for using keys. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 15 '10 at 13:10
    
@Dimitre-Novatchev: why dont you use simple xpath instead of key in this particular situation? –  Alex Nikolaenkov Nov 15 '10 at 13:18
    
@Alex Nikolaenkov: Because comments have an implicit reference to next sibling element id (@name in this case). Keys are the right XSLT tool for cross references. –  user357812 Nov 15 '10 at 21:57

When copying corresponding beatle node you should apply its comments also. That's all you need to do.

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="beatles">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="beatle">
                <xsl:sort select="@name" data-type="text"/>
            </xsl:apply-templates>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="beatle">
        <xsl:variable name="current" select="."/>
        <xsl:apply-templates
                select="preceding-sibling::comment()[generate-id(following-sibling::beatle[1]) = generate-id($current)]"/>
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>


    <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1251"?>
<xml>
    <beatles>
        <beatle name="George"/>
        <!-- comment(1): john is actually my favourite -->
        <!-- comment(2): John died tragically in 1980 -->
        <beatle name="John"/>
        <!-- comment(1): Paul still does live concerts to this day -->
        <!-- comment(2): contrary to common folklore, Paul is NOT dead! -->
        <beatle name="Paul"/>
        <beatle name="Ringo"/>
    </beatles>
</xml>
share|improve this answer
    
This is the approach I'd take, though it will start performing pretty poorly if there are 11,000 Beatles. –  Robert Rossney Nov 15 '10 at 19:28
    
Good form, everyone! I ended up using @Alex Nikolaenkov's solution, since my problem was a little more complicated than ordering the same nodes - I have several different nodes, with groups of node types that have to be ordered, so the solution Alex provided fit better. @Tim-C - thank you for your answer as well, as I learned a little more about XSLT (which I started learning only yesterday). Thanks again all!! –  deebugger Nov 15 '10 at 19:31
    
@Robert Rossney - probably so, but my problem doesn't involve that many nodes, so I'm happily using it.. –  deebugger Nov 15 '10 at 19:33
    
In case there are 110000 beatles I think rewriting with the xsl:key should speed up things a bit. But I think that optimizations should be done when we know the particular use case and its problems. –  Alex Nikolaenkov Nov 15 '10 at 19:43
    
It won't only speed up a bit. It will have a better performance algorithm instead of going back and forward with XPath. –  user357812 Nov 15 '10 at 22:01

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