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I would like my command line java program to output colored texts into the unix console. I am specifically using gnome-terminal on Ubuntu 10.4. I am able to get colors with something like echo "\033[01;32m"Hello on the terminal.

How can I trigger this with java code? Thanks

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i think there is no library for that but check this guide for colors. bashscript.blogspot.com/2010/01/… – ahvargas Nov 15 '10 at 8:40
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you don't care about terminal compatibility, just replace echo with System.out.println( above. For example,

System.out.println("\033[01;32mHello\n");
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I tried System.out.println("\"\\033[01;32m\"Hello"); but it did not work.. The color prefix disappears, but the color does not change. – artsince Nov 15 '10 at 8:41
2  
Too many escapes. Just something like System.out.println("\033[01;32mHello\n"); works. – Nicholas Riley Nov 15 '10 at 8:49
    
Oh That works, too. Thanks! – artsince Nov 15 '10 at 8:59
1  
Just need to add \033[0m to the end of the string in order to revert to the default color. – artsince Nov 15 '10 at 9:13

The color of text is at the OS layer so I think you can do it using JNI call.

Try this example

Note: make unix equivalent of that,

OR

javacurses is also helpful in your case

OR

enigma-shell is also helpful

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This is a very informative answer. However, I'd rather go for a quick and simple solution for this one. such as using the Runtime.getRuntime.exec() method. – artsince Nov 15 '10 at 8:54

This would do the trick:

Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("echo -e \"\\033[01;32m\"Could Not Add The Task!");

Then redirect the inputStream into the System.out like this:

        BufferedReader stdInput = new BufferedReader(new 
             InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));

        while ((s = stdInput.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
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Well, certainly, it's possible, but why print the characters directly? – Ondra Žižka May 4 at 16:41

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