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I want to put a configuration file in my Maven project. Looking at the standard directory layout, there are two places that seem sensible, "src/main/resources" and "src/main/config". Could someone explain the difference between these, and explain when you would put something in config and when in resources?

In this case, the file I'm looking at is ehcache.xml, but my question isn't ehcache specific, I'm curious for log4j.properties etc.

A bit of googling discovered this person had the same question, but the answers seemed contradictory, and not very authorative.

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I think I found a use case for the main/config directory. I have a couple of configuration files that are optional to use and are not useful in the classpath. Example configuration files for the app and the container it is deployed on. I can't find anywhere any other place for them. –  akostadinov Mar 28 '13 at 20:15
    
This might be a good place for eclipse plug-in config files (findbugs, checkstyle, etc.) I wouldn't want those bundled in the archive file. –  jbruni Oct 8 at 18:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 32 down vote accepted

The email exchange at http://www.mail-archive.com/users@maven.apache.org/msg90985.html says:

"This is all theory... Perhaps while writing the docs, someone involved with Maven development thought it might be useful to have a src/main/config directory and so it was included in docs, but since it was never implemented in the code, it is not being used today."

and

"The directory [src/main/config] doesn't show up on the classpath so the application or test classes can't read anything in it."

So just use src/main/resources.

Note: I don't know if this is true (I'm the question asker), but that would explain why so many people on the web recommend src/main/resources for log4j.properties. If people agree this is the right answer could you let me know (comment or vote) I put it here to save other people the typing.

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1  
This is correct, just use src/xxx/resources for all non sources files you want to get on the classpath. Sure, you can decide to add other directories but you'll need to add specific configuration to the POM. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 15 '10 at 20:25
    
Thanks for the clarification. I was looking at the documentation and the standard directory layout section makes no mention of this :( –  seneyr Jul 3 at 18:10

scr/main/resources is a place where you put your images, sounds, templates, language bundles, textual and binary files used by the source code. All config files like excache.xml, log4j.properties, logback.xml and others go to src/main/config.

Add to your pom.xml:

<build>
    <resources>
        <resource>
            <targetPath>.</targetPath>
            <directory>src/main/config</directory>
        </resource>
    </resources>
</build>
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this seems sensible to me, but do you have a reference? There are various emails, eg markmail.org/message/lve4d2qzba2lritd saying resources is the standard placement for log4j.properties –  Nick Fortescue Nov 15 '10 at 9:35
    
Can't find any. It's just a common sense. Wherever you put it just make sure it's on a classpath so it will be picked up by log4j library. –  Boris Pavlović Nov 15 '10 at 9:41
4  
@Nick you can follow your own rule but src/xxx/resources is indeed the standard placement for configuration files in practice. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 15 '10 at 20:15
5  
Anytime you need to explicitly supply a directory to a Maven config you're doing something non-standard. I personally put files like log4j.properties in src/main/resources and it "just works". –  Leif Gruenwoldt Jun 20 '12 at 13:15
2  
I agree with this solution. Things you put in src/main/resources by default become part of your jar file. If you want your config files to live outside of your jars then I believe it makes more sense to use src/main/config. Just my two cents. –  nolan6000 May 8 at 15:02

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