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I have a sql query that takes a date parameter (if I were to throw it into a function) and I need to run it on every day of the last year.

Does anyone know of an easy way to generate a list of the last 365 days so I can use straight-up sql to do this?

Obviously generating a list 0..364 would work too since I could always

select SYSDATE - val from (...);
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1  
Don't forget not every year is 365 days in a year :P –  TravisO Jan 6 '09 at 21:57
    
true, but given that this is being run once a year I figure they can make the adjustment themselves –  George Mauer Jan 6 '09 at 22:02
    
Until the next leap year when they forget that they have to adjust the process before running it... –  Tom H. Jan 7 '09 at 5:29
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11 Answers 11

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This should get you started. You will need to check that the boundary conditions are correct for your scenario (ie. did you want today included - this starts at yesterday).

WITH DAYS AS
(SELECT TRUNC(SYSDATE) - ROWNUM D
 FROM ALL_OBJECTS
 WHERE ROWNUM < 365)
SELECT
  DAYS.D
FROM
  DAYS;

To break this down a little. This part defines a table-like thing you can use in the following part of the SQL:

WITH DAYS AS
(SELECT TRUNC(SYSDATE) - ROWNUM D
 FROM ALL_OBJECTS
 WHERE ROWNUM < 365)

Then, you can act like "DAYS" is a table in the SELECT part of the statement.

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sorry, didn't see your answer till I posted mine. Technically you got in there first. –  George Mauer Jan 6 '09 at 21:57
    
Really bad idea. Your DBA will shoot you for doing this. Use @user34850's solution instead. –  Rob Baillie Mar 5 at 21:46
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There's no need to use extra large tables or ALL_OBJECTS table:

SELECT TRUNC (SYSDATE - ROWNUM) dt
  FROM DUAL CONNECT BY ROWNUM < 366

will do the trick.

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1  
Thank you very much! Was able to use this thinking to get all dates between sysdate +/- 30. For reference to others, the question & applicable answer is at stackoverflow.com/q/9166877/316847 –  SeanKilleen Feb 6 '12 at 21:22
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Oracle specific, and doesn't rely on pre-existing large tables or complicated system views over data dictionary objects.

SELECT c1 from dual
  MODEL DIMENSION BY (1 as rn)  MEASURES (sysdate as c1)
  RULES ITERATE (365) 
  (c1[ITERATION_NUMBER]=SYSDATE-ITERATION_NUMBER)
order by 1
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2  
Care to explain how this works? –  WW. Jan 9 '09 at 2:35
1  
@WW : magic!! –  Keng Feb 10 '11 at 16:16
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A method quite frequently used in Oracle is something like this:

select trunc(sysdate)-rn
from
(   select rownum rn
    from   dual
    connect by level <= 365)
/

Personally, if an application has a need for a list of dates then I'd just create a table with them, or create a table with a series of integers up to something ridiculous like one million that can be used for this sort of thing.

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About a year and a half too late, but for posterity here is a version for Teradata:

SELECT calendar_date 
FROM SYS_CALENDAR.Calendar
WHERE SYS_CALENDAR.Calendar.calendar_date between '2010-01-01' (date) and '2010-01-03' (date)
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Posterity nothing; that helped me figure out some bizzarely difficult to track down sql commands for TD. Why can't you just find something with a list of sql commands in TD like you can everywhere else? –  Keng Feb 10 '11 at 16:14
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 SELECT (sysdate-365 + (LEVEL -1)) AS DATES
 FROM DUAL connect by level <=( sysdate-(sysdate-365))

if a 'from' and a 'to' date is replaced in place of sysdate and sysdate-365, the output will be a range of dates between the from and to date.

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I had the same requirement - I just use this. User enters the number of days by which he/she wants to limit the calendar range to.

  SELECT DAY, offset
    FROM (SELECT to_char(SYSDATE, 'DD-MON-YYYY') AS DAY, 0 AS offset
            FROM DUAL
          UNION ALL
          SELECT to_char(SYSDATE - rownum, 'DD-MON-YYYY'), rownum
            FROM all_objects d)
            where offset <= &No_of_days

I use the above result set as driving view in LEFT OUTER JOIN with other views involving tables which have dates.

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Ahahaha, here's a funny way I just came up with to do this:

select SYSDATE - ROWNUM
from shipment_weights sw
where ROWNUM < 365;

where shipment_weights is any large table;

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For the fun of it, here's some code that should work in SQL Server, Oracle, or MySQL:

SELECT current_timestamp - CAST(d1.digit + d2.digit + d3.digit as int)
FROM 
(
	SELECT digit
	FROM
	(
		select '1' as digit
		union select '2'
		union select '3'
		union select '4'
		union select '5'
		union select '6'
		union select '7'
		union select '8'
		union select '9'
		union select '0'
	) digits
) d1
CROSS JOIN
(
	SELECT digit
	FROM
	(
		select '1' as digit
		union select '2'
		union select '3'
		union select '4'
		union select '5'
		union select '6'
		union select '7'
		union select '8'
		union select '9'
		union select '0'
	) digits
) d2
CROSS JOIN
(
	SELECT digit
	FROM
	(
		select '1' as digit
		union select '2'
		union select '3'
		union select '4'
		union select '5'
		union select '6'
		union select '7'
		union select '8'
		union select '9'
		union select '0'
	) digits
) d3
WHERE CAST(d1.digit + d2.digit + d3.digit as int) < 365
ORDER BY d1.digit, d2.digit, d3.digit -- order not really needed here

Bonus points if you can give me a cross-platform syntax to re-use the digits table.

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On Oracle you have to add FROM DUAL for each "Union select" –  FerranB Jan 6 '09 at 22:35
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I don't have the answer to re-use the digits table but here is a code sample that will work at least in SQL server and is a bit faster.

print("code sample");

select  top 366 current_timestamp - row_number() over( order by l.A * r.A) as DateValue
from (
select	1 as A union
select	2 union
select	3 union
select	4 union
select	5 union
select	6 union
select	7 union
select	8 union
select	9 union
select	10 union
select	11 union
select	12 union
select	13 union
select	14 union
select	15 union
select	16 union
select	17 union
select	18 union
select	19 union
select	20 union
select	21 
) l
cross join (
select 1 as A union
select 2 union
select 3 union
select 4 union
select 5 union
select 6 union
select 7 union
select 8 union
select 9 union
select 10 union
select 11 union
select 12 union
select 13 union
select 14 union
select 15 union
select 16 union
select 17 union
select 18
) r
print("code sample");
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just to note this works in SQL2005 but not SQL2000 –  Magnus Smith Feb 27 '09 at 9:54
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This query generates a list of dates 4000 days in the future and 5000 in the past as of today (inspired on http://blogs.x2line.com/al/articles/207.aspx):

SELECT * FROM (SELECT (CONVERT(SMALLDATETIME, CONVERT(CHAR,GETDATE() ,103)) + 4000 -

           n4.num * 1000 -
           n3.num * 100 -
           n2.num * 10 -
           n1.num) AS Date, 
           year(CONVERT(SMALLDATETIME,

CONVERT(CHAR,GETDATE() ,103)) + 4000 -

           n4.num * 1000 -
           n3.num * 100 -
           n2.num * 10 -
           n1.num) as Year,
           month(CONVERT(SMALLDATETIME,

CONVERT(CHAR,GETDATE() ,103)) + 4000 -

           n4.num * 1000 -
           n3.num * 100 -
           n2.num * 10 -
           n1.num) as Month,
           day(CONVERT(SMALLDATETIME,

CONVERT(CHAR,GETDATE() ,103)) + 4000 -

           n4.num * 1000 -
           n3.num * 100 -
           n2.num * 10 -
           n1.num) as Day
      FROM (SELECT 0 AS num union ALL
            SELECT 1 UNION ALL
            SELECT 2 UNION ALL
            SELECT 3 UNION ALL
            SELECT 4 UNION ALL
            SELECT 5 UNION ALL
            SELECT 6 UNION ALL
            SELECT 7 UNION ALL
            SELECT 8 UNION ALL
            SELECT 9) n1
          ,(SELECT 0 AS num UNION ALL
            SELECT 1 UNION ALL
            SELECT 2 UNION ALL
            SELECT 3 UNION ALL
            SELECT 4 UNION ALL
            SELECT 5 UNION ALL
            SELECT 6 UNION ALL
            SELECT 7 UNION ALL
            SELECT 8 UNION ALL
            SELECT 9) n2
          ,(SELECT 0 AS num union ALL
            SELECT 1 UNION ALL
            SELECT 2 UNION ALL
            SELECT 3 UNION ALL
            SELECT 4 UNION ALL
            SELECT 5 UNION ALL
            SELECT 6 UNION ALL
            SELECT 7 UNION ALL
            SELECT 8 UNION ALL
            SELECT 9) n3  
          ,(SELECT 0 AS num UNION ALL
            SELECT 1 UNION ALL
            SELECT 2 UNION ALL
            SELECT 3 UNION ALL
            SELECT 4 UNION ALL
            SELECT 5 UNION ALL
            SELECT 6 UNION ALL
            SELECT 7 UNION ALL
            SELECT 8) n4
   ) GenCalendar  ORDER BY 1
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