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If you have a query such as:

select a.Name, a.Description from a
inner join b on a.id1 = b.id1
inner join c on b.id2 = c.id2
group by a.Name, a.Description

What would be the most optimal columns to index for this query in SQLite if you consider that there are over 100,000 rows in each of the tables?

The reason that I ask is that I do not get the performance with the query with the group by that I would expect from another RDBMS (SQL Server) when I apply the same optimisation.

Would I be right in thinking that all columns referenced on a single table in a query in SQLite need to be included in a single composite index for best performance?

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2  
My inner psychopath is twitching at the fact that you have a group by clause without any aggregate function(s). What are you trying to achieve with the group by? – My Other Me Nov 15 '10 at 13:24
1  
@MyOtherMe: See my answer below, I think he wants a distinct of all descriptions and names that are referenced in the b and c tables. – MPelletier Nov 15 '10 at 13:27
    
Thats exactly what I'm after. – grrrrrrrrrrrrr Nov 22 '10 at 9:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're expecting SQLite to have the same performance characteristics as a full RDBMS. It won't. SQLLite doesn't have the luxury of getting to cache quite as much in memory, has to rebuild the cache every time you run the application, is probably limited to set number of cores, etc, etc, etc. Tradeoffs for using an embedded RDBMS over a full one.

As far as optimizations go, try indexing the lookup columns and test. Then try creating a covering index. Be sure to test both selects and code paths that update the database, you're speeding up one at the expense of the other. Find the indexing that gives the best balance between the two for your needs and go with it.

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Thanks for the answer, I have previously attempted to add a composite index previously on a.Id1, a.name, a.description, and a composite on b.id1, b.id2, and another index on c.id2. However, none of these helped with the performance of the group by. This is kind of what prompted the question as it seems to be impossible to eek out sufficient group by performance in this situation with SQLite. I guess this is just one of the limitations of having an embedded database. – grrrrrrrrrrrrr Nov 22 '10 at 9:41

Since you're not using the other tables for your return columns, perhaps this will be faster:

SELECT DISTINCT a.Name, a.Description
FROM a, b, c
WHERE a.id1 = b.id1
AND b.id2 = c.id2

Looking at the returned columns, since the criteria seems to be only that they must be linked from a to b to c, you could look for all unique a.Name and a.Description pairs.

SELECT DISTINCT a.Name, a.Description
FROM a
WHERE a.id1 IN (
 SELECT b.id1
 FROM b
 WHERE b.id2 IN (
  SELECT c.id2
  FROM c
  )
 )

Or, depending on if every pair of a.Name and a.Description is already unique, there should be some gain in finding out first the unique id's then fetching the other columns.

SELECT a.Name, a.Description
FROM a 
WHERE a.id1 IN (
 SELECT DISTINCT a.id1
 FROM a
 WHERE a.id1 IN (
  SELECT b.id1
  FROM b
  WHERE b.id2 IN (
   SELECT c.id2
   FROM c
   )
  )
 )
share|improve this answer

I think indexes on a.id1 and b.id2 would give you about as much benefit as you could get in terms of the JOINs. But SQLite offers EXPLAIN, and it might help you determine if there's an avoidable in efficiency in the current execution plan.

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From the SQLite query optimization overview:

When doing an indexed lookup of a row, the usual procedure is to do a binary search on the index to find the index entry, then extract the rowid from the index and use that rowid to do a binary search on the original table. Thus a typical indexed lookup involves two binary searches. If, however, all columns that were to be fetched from the table are already available in the index itself, SQLite will use the values contained in the index and will never look up the original table row. This saves one binary search for each row and can make many queries run twice as fast.

For any other RDBMS, I'd say to put a clustered index on b.id1 and c.id2. For SQLite, you might be better off including any columns from b and c that you want to lookup in those indexes too.

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Covering indexes exist in pretty much every RDBMS and have the same effect on lookups. The problem is that large indexes hurt insert / update performance, and so you have to juggle the tradeoff between update performance and select performance. – Donnie Nov 15 '10 at 13:16
    
Thanks for the reply, please excuse my ignorance here, but are you saying its possible in SQLite to create an index including columns from multiple tables, similar to an indexed view in SQLServer? – grrrrrrrrrrrrr Nov 22 '10 at 9:43
    
Well no, I was saying that when you create an index on B, don't just create the index on B.id but also include all data columns that you need from B in the index. This will save you one binary search for those data columns. In another DBMS you could probably be even faster by including columns from multiple tables in an index, but SQLite is not that advanced. – littlegreen Nov 23 '10 at 10:40

Beware: I know nothing of possible intricacies of SQLite and its execution plans.

You definitely need indexes on a.id1, b.id1, b.id2 and c.id2. I think a composite index (b.id1, b.id2) could yield a small performance increase. The same goes for (a.id1, a.Name, a.Description).

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