Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

fgetc() and other input functions can return when there's no data on the file descriptor. This can be simulated for console applications reading from stdin typing Ctrl-D on keyboard (at least on unix). But how to do it programmatically? For example, how to return from the fgetc() in the reader thread in the following code (NB: ignore the possible race condition)?

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void* reader()
{
    char read_char;
    while((read_char = fgetc(stdin)) != EOF) {
        ;
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(void)
{
    pthread_t thread;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, reader, NULL);

    // Do something so the fgetc in the reader thread will return

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
I think you simply want to close() the other end of the pipe but you example doesn't really make sense as the main thread doesn't control the other end of stdin. –  Alexandre Jasmin Nov 15 '10 at 12:27
    
I tried this weeks ago but I didn't find any mean of knowing the other end of stdin. Any other way to achieve the same goal? Maybe I am missing something: I just need a way to not block threads on console input. –  ceztko Nov 15 '10 at 14:02
    
The other end of stdin is typically the keyboard of your terminal. Perhaps what you need is non-blocking I/O? It's hard to tell from your question. You should explain what you are trying to do in more details. –  Alexandre Jasmin Nov 15 '10 at 14:08
1  
No, I don't need non-blocking I/O. Not in the sense I should poll for input with timeouts with select() or poll() at least: this would be wronger than trying to close the terminal keyboard device. It seems to me I was getting the wrong point trying to access stdin from different threads. This is probably wrong and I should avoid this by keeping a state of my application in the scope of the input "reader" so I can easily track when input should be processed or not. –  ceztko Nov 15 '10 at 15:38
    
Incidentally, the Windows equivalent to UNIX's control-D is control-Z. –  Harry Johnston May 4 '14 at 21:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems you want a threads to stop blocking on fgetc(stdin) when some event occurs to handle that event instead. If that's the case you could select() on both stdin and some other message pipe so that the thread can handle input from both:

fd_set descriptor_set
FD_ZERO(&descriptor_set); 
FD_SET(STDIN_FILENO, &descriptor_set); 
FD_SET(pipefd, &descriptor_set); 

if (select(FD_SETSIZE, &descriptor_set, NULL, NULL, NULL) < 0) 
{ 
  // select() error
} 

if (FD_ISSET(STDIN_FILENO, &descriptor_set)) {
  // read byte from stdin
  read(STDIN_FILENO, &c, 1);
}

if (FD_ISSET(pipefd, &descriptor_set)) 
  // Special event. Do something else

Also note that only one thread in your process should be reading from stdin.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's exactly the answer to my question, super thanks! It may be overkill in my real needs but anyway this is THE way go if someone need a similar pattern. I was near this solution when I tried this weeks ago but I completely missed the ability of select() to track more than one file descriptor. In my previous comment about not using select() or poll() I was against using timeouts but it seems you perfectly got the point. Thanks again! –  ceztko Nov 15 '10 at 16:19

Alexandre posted the correct solution. His answer respond precisely to the question I asked. It follows simple self compiling code based on his hints:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/select.h>

static int pipe_fds[2];

void* user_interaction()
{
    char read_char;

    fd_set descriptor_set;
    FD_ZERO(&descriptor_set); 
    FD_SET(STDIN_FILENO, &descriptor_set); 
    FD_SET(pipe_fds[0], &descriptor_set);

    while(1)
    {
        if (select(FD_SETSIZE, &descriptor_set, NULL, NULL, NULL) < 0) {
            // select() error
        }

        if (FD_ISSET(STDIN_FILENO, &descriptor_set)) {
            // read byte from stdin
            read(STDIN_FILENO, &read_char, 1);
        }

        if (FD_ISSET(pipe_fds[0], &descriptor_set))
            // Special event. break
            break;
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(void)
{
    pipe(pipe_fds);

    pthread_t thread;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, user_interaction, NULL);

    // Before closing write pipe endpoint you are supposed
    // to do something useful

    close(pipe_fds[1]);

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}
share|improve this answer

You can either 'close' standard input, or connect standard input to '/dev/null' ('NUL:' on Windows) with freopen(), or you can connect standard input to '/dev/zero'.

If you close it, every function call will fail because the file stream is not valid. If you connect it to the null data source, all reads will fail and return EOF immediately. If you connect it to the zero data source, every read will succeed and return a corresponding number of zero bytes.

It is possible one of those will suit your needs sufficiently. If not, then you probably need to give us a more detailed explanation of what you actually need.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this without success some time ago but does not seems portable and in fact it doesn't work on linux. Trying to close stdin (or any other file descriptor) while fgetc() is waiting for data does block here. Got discussed here: lkml.indiana.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/0106.0/0768.html with reference to select() and reply from linux devs was: "undefined behavior". –  ceztko Nov 15 '10 at 15:18
    
@ceztko: closing standard input in one thread while another thread is reading - yes, that is not going to be reliable...I must have misread the question. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '10 at 17:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.