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I know the POSIX sleep(x) function makes the program sleep for x seconds. Is there a function to make the program sleep for x milliseconds in C++?

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3  
You should be aware that, in Windows anyway, Sleep() has millisecond precision, but it's accuracy can be orders of magnitude higher. You may think your sleeping for 4 milliseconds, but actually sleep for 400. –  John Dibling Nov 15 '10 at 13:09
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@John Dibling: I think he's using POSIX sleep, not win32 Sleep given "x seconds". –  Charles Bailey Nov 15 '10 at 13:14
    
@Mac : well i was in a hurry when I initially asked this question.. –  Prasanth Madhavan Jan 29 '13 at 15:47
4  
Vote Down. you asked for C++ and accepted an answer for pure C. if you are actually using C++ you can't include <unistd.h> –  eladyanai22 Jun 17 at 13:09

10 Answers 10

up vote 140 down vote accepted

Note that there is no standard C API for milliseconds, so (on Unix) you will have to settle for usleep, which accepts microseconds:

#include <unistd.h>

unsigned int microseconds;
...
usleep(microseconds);
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:Pi know that... jst wondering if there ws an easier way.. –  Prasanth Madhavan Nov 15 '10 at 12:57
52  
@Pransanth Madhavan: * 1000 isn't that hard. You could wrap it in a function of your own if you really want but it's going to be one of the more trivial adaptations that you'll ever have to make to meet a library interface. –  Charles Bailey Nov 15 '10 at 13:00
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which header file has this defined? –  Janus Troelsen Dec 22 '11 at 14:40
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5 discussion comments about a multiplication with 1000, how easy it is and if there would be an easier way :) ... interesting –  Kenyakorn Ketsombut Sep 11 '13 at 7:21
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It wouldn't hurt if the answer was in the form of a MWE =) –  puk Nov 6 '13 at 0:17

In Unix you can use usleep.

In Windows there is Sleep.

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1  
and the Windows call is in milliseconds. –  shindigo Sep 13 '13 at 14:06
1  
You have to include <unistd.h> or <Windows.h> respectively. –  gbmhunter May 7 at 5:13

The way to sleep your program in c++ is the Sleep(int); method. The header file for it is #include "windows.h." For example:

 #include "stdafx.h"
    #include "windows.h"
    #include "iostream"
    using namespace std;
    int main(){
    int x = 6000;
    Sleep(x);
    cout << "it has been 6 seconds" << endl;

    return 0;
    }

The time it sleeps is measured in milliseconds and has no limit.

Second = 1000 milliseconds
Minute = 60000 milliseconds
Hour = 3600000 milliseconds
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Why don't use time.h library? Runs on Windows and POSIX systems:

#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>

using namespace std;

void sleepcp(int milliseconds);

void sleepcp(int milliseconds) // cross-platform sleep function
{
    clock_t time_end;
    time_end = clock() + milliseconds * CLOCKS_PER_SEC/1000;
    while (clock() < time_end)
    {
    }
}
int main()
{
cout << "Hi! At the count to 3, I'll die! :)" << endl;
sleepcp(3000);
cout << "urrrrggghhhh!" << endl;
}

corrected code - now CPU stays in IDLE state [2014.05.24]:

#include <iostream>
#ifdef WIN32
#include <windows.h>
#else
#include <unistd.h>
#endif // win32

using namespace std;

void sleepcp(int milliseconds);

void sleepcp(int milliseconds) // cross-platform sleep function
{
    #ifdef WIN32
    Sleep(milliseconds);
    #else
    usleep(milliseconds * 1000);
    #endif // win32
}
int main()
{
cout << "Hi! At the count to 3, I'll die! :)" << endl;
sleepcp(3000);
cout << "urrrrggghhhh!" << endl;
}
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1  
One of the problems with that code is that it is a busy loop, it will continue using the 100% of a single processor core. The sleep function is implemented around an OS call that will put to sleep the current thread and do something else, and only will wake up the thread when the specified time expires. –  Ismael May 20 at 22:53
    
You're right - it will consume 100% of a one CPU core. So here is rewritten code using system sleep functions - and it's still cross-platform: –  Bart Grzybicki May 23 at 22:25

Syntax:

Sleep (  __in DWORD dwMilliseconds   );

Usage:

Sleep (1000); //Sleeps for 1000 ms or 1 sec
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What do you need to include for this? –  Bob the zealot Jun 25 at 4:21
    
#include <WinBase.h> –  foobar Jun 25 at 5:40
    
No, you need to #include <windows.h> –  Bob the zealot Jun 26 at 2:39

In C++11, you can do this with standard library facilities:

std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(x));

Clear and readable, no more need to guess at what units the sleep function takes.

like stated by Rhubbarb, you will need:

#include <chrono>
#include <thread>
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2  
Does std::this_thread::sleep_for define an interruption point? Like boost::this_thread_sleep does? –  Martin Meeser Jul 18 '13 at 9:28
6  
This is the right way to do it. Period. Thread is cross platform as well as chrono. –  Void Nov 19 '13 at 18:36

Select call is a way of having more precision (sleep time can be specified in nanoseconds).

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Depending on your platform you may have usleep or nanosleep available. usleep is deprecated and has been deleted from the most recent POSIX standard; nanosleep is preferred.

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Note that while usleep() is declared in <unistd.h>, confusingly, nanosleep() is declared in <time.h>/<ctime>. –  gbmhunter May 7 at 5:14

nanosleep is a better choice than usleep - it is more resilient against interrupts.

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To stay portable you could use Boost::Thread for sleeping:

#include <boost/thread/thread.hpp>

int main()
{
    //waits 2 seconds
    boost::this_thread::sleep( boost::posix_time::seconds(1) );
    boost::this_thread::sleep( boost::posix_time::milliseconds(1000) );

    return 0;
}

This answer is a duplicate and has been posted in this question before. Perhaps you could find some usable answers there too.

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3  
Keep in mind that - in a multi-threaded environment -boost::this_thread::sleep adds an interruption point to your code. boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/doc/html/thread/… –  Martin Meeser Jul 18 '13 at 9:25

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