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I'd like to iterate through all the <HeadA> and <HeadB> elements in an XML file, and add a unique id to each. The approach I've tried so far is:

@xml.each_element('//HeadA | //HeadB') do |heading|
  #add a new id
end

The problem is, the nodeset from the XPath //HeadA | //HeadB is all the HeadAs followed by all the HeadBs. What I need is an ordered list of all the HeadAs and HeadBs in the order they appear in the document.

Just to clarify, my XML could look like this:

<Doc>
  <HeadA>First HeadA</HeadA>
  <HeadB>First HeadB</HeadB>
  <HeadA>Second HeadA</HeadA>
  <HeadB>Second HeadB</HeadB>
</Doc>

And what I'm getting from the XPath is:

  <HeadA>First HeadA</HeadA>
  <HeadA>Second HeadA</HeadA>
  <HeadB>First HeadB</HeadB>
  <HeadB>Second HeadB</HeadB>

when what I need to get is the nodes in order:

  <HeadA>First HeadA</HeadA>
  <HeadB>First HeadB</HeadB>
  <HeadA>Second HeadA</HeadA>
  <HeadB>Second HeadB</HeadB>

so I can add the ids sequentially.

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1  
Any compliant XPath engine must select the nodes in document order. Yours is obviously non-compliant. Strongly recommend not to use it and not to mistakenly believe that this is XPath. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 15 '10 at 21:00
    
@Dimitre Thanks, that's good to know. –  Skilldrick Nov 16 '10 at 9:10
    
@Dimitre: In fact, there is no specification enforcing the order of a resulting node set. This is hosting language responsability. You are right about that mostly every XPath engine will use the document order. –  user357812 Nov 16 '10 at 15:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, 2nd try, but I think I've got it this time :P

@xml.each_element('//*[self::HeadA or self::HeadB]') do |heading|
  puts heading.text
end
share|improve this answer
    
That did it! I've managed to turn my old 8 gnarly lines into 5 beautiful and clear lines. Thanks :) –  Skilldrick Nov 15 '10 at 14:49
    
Check the XPath syntax. –  user357812 Nov 16 '10 at 15:17

Using Nokogiri to parse the XML:

xml = %q{
<Doc>
    <HeadA>First HeadA</HeadA>
    <HeadB>First HeadB</HeadB>
    <HeadA>Second HeadA</HeadA>
    <HeadB>Second HeadB</HeadB>
</Doc>
}

doc = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
doc.search('//HeadA | //HeadB').map{ |n| n.inner_text } #=> ["First HeadA", "First HeadB", "Second HeadA", "Second HeadB"]

For your task you could replace map with each or each_with_index and be almost done. Just add the code to insert the unique ID.

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1  
Thanks. I haven't used Nokogiri before, but that looks like a nice Rubyish kind of technique. –  Skilldrick Nov 15 '10 at 16:02
    
Nokogiri rocks for XML and HTML parsing. What's especially cool about it is that you can actually use the simpler CSS accessors for a lot of XML lookups. –  the Tin Man Nov 15 '10 at 18:22

I've come up with a quick and dirty solution:

as_string = @xml.to_s
counter = 0
as_string.gsub!(/(<HeadA>|<HeadB>)/) do |str|
  result = str.sub '>', " id='#{counter}'>"
  counter += 1
  result
end
@xml = REXML::Document.new as_string

It's not the prettiest or most efficient probably, but it does what I wanted it to do.

Edit: Taking D-D-Doug's advice, I've now got this:

counter = 0
@xml.each_element('//[self::HeadA or self::HeadB]') do |heading|
  heading.attributes['id'] = "id%03d" % counter
  counter += 1
end

which is MUCH nicer.

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Would it work for you if you looped through all HeadA and, within each HeadA, loop through each HeadB?

@xml.each_element("//HeadA") do |headA|
  #do stuff to headA
  headA.each_element("HeadB") do |headB|
    #do stuff to headB
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
No, they're not nested. Thanks though. –  Skilldrick Nov 15 '10 at 14:12

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