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We need to scrape the body of blog articles for our system (it's legit, I swear - we have a training blog and we want to display the content in help dialogs inside the system). The blogs are written on a 3rd party platform that produces HTML like so:

<div class="post">
    <h3 class="title">Title content</h3>

    <div class="byline">
        Byline content
    </div>

    <div class="submissions">
        Submission content
    </div>

    <div class="buttons">
    </div>

    <p>Post body part 1</p>
    some more post body not in a tag, however the user enters it
    <p>Even more post body</p>

    <div class="tags">
        Tag content
    </div>      
</div>

I'm trying to get all the HTML content inside the post div, but excluding the title, byline, submissions, buttons, and tags sections.

If I run this jQuery:

$(".post").not(".title").not(".byline").not(".submissions").not(".buttons").not(".tags").html()

I get back the entire content of the post div, including the unwanted headers/divs. I've tried various incantations of not, including :not, and Googling until my eyes hurt, to no avail.

Any ideas? Seems like it should be pretty easy, so I'm guessing I'm missing something? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try using the find method with :not like so

$('div.post').find(":not(.title,.byline,.submissions,.buttons,.tags)");

Season to taste.

The other option is to just hide the unwanted elements:

$('div.post').find('.title, .byline, .submissions, .buttons, .tags').hide();
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This is much better than my solution. :) –  clifgriffin Nov 15 '10 at 14:38

You're using selectors incorrectly. Once it finds $(".post"), it will not look inside to exclude the content of that div. $(".post") matches the selector precisely by not being title, byline, submissions, ad infinitum.

I suggest you target those other classes for removal and then grab html() or .post.

Make sense?

EDIT: (Please don't vote me down without trying my method...it isn't great but it works)

$(".title").remove();
$(".byline").remove();
$(".submissions").remove();
$(".buttons").remove();
$(".tags").remove();
alert($(".post").html());
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you could just as easily do $(".post").find(".title,.byline,.submissions,.buttons,.tags").remove(); –  hunter Nov 15 '10 at 14:40
    
Yeah, I was in a race to redeem my reputation :) –  clifgriffin Nov 15 '10 at 14:44

You should be able to isolate that text using the children() method with a :not selector

$(".post").children(":not(.title,.byline,.submissions,.buttons,.tags)");

http://api.jquery.com/children/

or to totally isolate the content you want you could write:

var $cleansed = $(".post").clone();
$cleansed.find(".title,.byline,.submissions,.buttons,.tags").remove();

// append() or $cleansed.html() this content somewhere
share|improve this answer
    
This does not work. –  clifgriffin Nov 15 '10 at 14:33
    
This will only return the contents of the first child, right? –  Steve Greatrex Nov 15 '10 at 14:33
    
not all the required text is part of a paragraph –  NimChimpsky Nov 15 '10 at 14:39
    
@clifgriffin, yes, it will work –  hunter Nov 15 '10 at 14:41
    
@Him - whoops, thought that inner text was within the p tag –  hunter Nov 15 '10 at 14:43

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