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I have a function that I call to retrieve a sliding pane (telerik splitter control) I thought I could use this function

function getZone() {
        var slidingZone = $find("<%= slidingZone.ClientID %>");
        return function () { return slidingZone; };
    }

so that it didn't have to "find" the sliding zone every time. But it doesn't work.

This does...

function getZone() {
        var slidingZone = $find("<%= slidingZone.ClientID %>");
        return slidingZone;    
}

Can you tell me why the first one isn't working?

BTW, I'm using it like this....

function hideTreePane() {
        var paneId = "<%= slidingPane.ClientID %>";
        getZone().undockPane(paneId);
        return true;
    }
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, the first function, returns a function, and you want the inner function to be executed.

If you invoke the result of it you will see it work, e.g.:

getZone()();

I think you want the following, use an immediately executed anonymous function, to call the $find method only once, storing its result:

var getZone = (function() {
  var slidingZone = $find("<%= slidingZone.ClientID %>");
  return function () { return slidingZone; };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
yes, that's what I was thinking of. –  Tom B Nov 15 '10 at 15:18
    
@Tom, yes, because IMO there's no point to do what the accepted answer suggests, the returned function is not really useful, you'll still execute $find always, behind the scenes... And it can cause confusion e.g., How a developer would know that getZone actually returns another function to be executed? –  CMS Nov 15 '10 at 15:54
    
why would it execute find behind the scenes? My impression was the returned function would have access to the result of $find (the variable slidingZone) due to javascript's implementation of closure. That was kind of what I was going for. –  Tom B Nov 16 '10 at 15:57

Because your returning a function and you need to evaluate it... If using the first function this may work..

function hideTreePane() { 
    var paneId = "<%= slidingPane.ClientID %>"; 
    var zoneFunc = getZone();
    zoneFunc().undockPane(paneId); 
    return true; 
} 
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Thanks, that makes sense. –  Tom B Nov 15 '10 at 15:08

You will need to call the function you are returning from getZone:

getZone()().undockPane( paneId );

It wasn't working because the function getZone itself does not have a member called undockPane.

EDIT:

I think it would be better to do this:

function getZone() {
    if ( getZone.cache === undefined )
        getZone.cach = $find("<%= slidingZone.ClientID %>");
    return getZone.cache;
}

Then you would call like this:

getZone().undockPane( paneId );
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1  
Correct, but yuck. –  tvanfosson Nov 15 '10 at 15:10
    
@tvanfosson: Agreed. –  Jonathan Swinney Nov 15 '10 at 15:19

In your first example you're returning a function, therefore getZone() becomes a function itself and you need to do getZone()() to get the slidingZone value you want.

There's no need to wrap your return value in a function for this case.

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You're returning a function from the first example, not a value. You'd need to evaluate the function for it to work. Try something like.

var slidingZone;
function getZone() {
    if (!slidingZone) {
        slidingZone = $find( ... );
    }
    return slidingZone;
}

It would be better for this to be part of a "class" so that the caching variable isn't in the global scope.

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