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Given HTML like the following, how can I get the last row to take up the remaining height, and have the n-1 first rows to take up just as much height as they need?

This seems to work as is in Chrome, but not in FF2 or IE6/7/8.

<table>
  <tr>
    <td rowspan="5"><div style="border: 1px solid #cdcdcd; width: 100px; height: 300px;"/></td>
    <td/>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>one</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>two</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>three</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>full</td>
  </tr>
</table>

So, the idea is that the last row, with "full" in it, should be really tall, and the other rows, "one", "two" and "three" should be as small as possible.

I've tried stuff like putting exact heights on the rows, say "<tr style="height:20px;"> and I've tried 100% height on the last row, no luck so far!

Update:

This layout is going to be used for varying types of content, and the intention is for the table to size itself to the content. Sometimes the div will be tall, then its height determines the table's height, but othertimes the div is short, then the rows (one, two, three) determine the table's height.

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I don't have a quick answer for you, but I think that you will have to use javascript to implement this feature. –  Matthew Vines Nov 15 '10 at 15:44
    
I'm hoping there is a non javascript solution :) –  Alex Black Nov 15 '10 at 16:09
    
Agreed, after some more testing I'm withdrawing my previous answer as it doesn't solve the height issue at all. Sorry about that. :-/ –  stealthyninja Nov 15 '10 at 17:03
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2 Answers

If javascript is ok, you could use jQuery and find the top position of the last row and the position of the bottom of the window or element. The difference should be set as the height of the last row.

I didn't do any code yet, because I wasn't sure if you were looking for a table inside of an object or to have it fill to the bottom of the window. I can do that for you if you'd like with some more detail.

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No javascript thanks. The intention is the table's height should be the height of its content. –  Alex Black Nov 15 '10 at 15:51
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html><body>
<table border=1>
  <tr>
    <td rowspan="2"><div style="border: 1px solid #cdcdcd; width: 100px; height: 300px;"/></td>
    <td valign=top style="padding:0px;">
        <table height=1>
            <tr>
                <td>one</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
                <td>two</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
                <td>three</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
    <td valign=top>full<br><br><br>more full</td>
  </tr>
        </table>
  </td>
  </tr>
</table>
</body></html>

Updatedx3, works in ie6/ff

share|improve this answer
    
1. I've got a lot invested in a table based layout, so if possible I need to stick with tables. 2. I imagine you'll disagree with me, but divs really suck at tabular layouts. –  Alex Black Nov 15 '10 at 15:50
    
I don't think setting "height: 100%;" will work on the table, I want the table to be as tall as it needs to be, not as tall as its container. –  Alex Black Nov 15 '10 at 15:51
    
Well by definition "As tall as it needs to be" is the fixed height but with the "Full" one collapsed, perhaps you want to set min-height: ##% on the last element instead? –  J V Nov 15 '10 at 15:54
    
The table's height should be the height of its content - the fixed height content (the div) might be the tallest, or it could be really short, then the rows (one, two, three) might be the tallest. –  Alex Black Nov 15 '10 at 15:56
    
ok, updated the html, should work now, the height: 1px; doesn't matter, it will expand if the contents deem neccesary –  J V Nov 15 '10 at 16:00
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