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I'm trying to create a custom HTML helper and I would like to know how I can access the Model object without passing it as a parameter.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 25 down vote accepted

If you are using strongly typed views which you should:

public static MvcHtmlString MyHelper<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper)
{
    TModel model = htmlHelper.ViewData.Model;
    return MvcHtmlString.Empty;
}

If you are not using strongly typed views which you shouldn't:

public static MvcHtmlString MyHelper(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper)
{
    object model = htmlHelper.ViewData.Model;
    return MvcHtmlString.Empty;
}
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@Darin If you wanted a Helper strongly typed for a specific model would you do something like public static MvcHtmlString FooBarFor(this HtmlHelper<FooBar> htmlHelper) ? –  AaronLS Nov 1 '12 at 21:43
    
@AaronLS, yes, precisely. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 2 '12 at 6:35

HTML helpers are a bad way to generate HTML programmatically. Web Forms is much better with code in a page class file and HTML markup in a separate file. Yes HTML helpers put some code in separate class files but you are calling code from your HTML page. Whats to stop you from writing code directly in your view page. MVC is supportive of lots of bad practices which you don't have to do but for some reason in Web Forms developers have to do bad practices because it is allowed. If you learn Web Forms well, you will develop maintainable and scalable web applications using modern object oriented patterns instead of procedural logic like HTML helpers.

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I'm not a fan of any markup being written in a class file either. I avoid helpers as much as possible. Though MVC certainly has it's problems (hence a certain amount of push towards MVVM), Web Forms was inherently broken, it was laced with so many painful compromises. –  AsciiSmoke Feb 3 at 11:17

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