Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a complex function (optimisation) that can potentially enter in a loop or just to take too much time, and the time allowed is set by the user.

Therefore I am trying to make to run the function in a separate thread, and to stop it if the maximum time is passed. I use a code similar to the one below, but it doesn't work, so

int timeMax = 2; //time in minutes  
Thread Thread_Object = new Thread_Class(... args...);
try {
  Thread_Object.start();
  Thread_Object.join(timeMax*60*1000);
}

I think that I'm not using the function "join" properly, or it doesn't do what I have understood. Any idea?

Thanks!


Thanks for the answers, currently I have found a better idea here*. It works but it still uses the function "stop" that is deprecated. The new code is:

Thread Thread_Object = new Thread_Class(... args...);

try {
  int timeMax = 1;
  Thread_Object.start();
  Thread.currentThread().sleep( timeMax * 1000 );

    if ( Thread_Object.isAlive() ) {
        Thread_Object.stop();
        Thread_Object.join();
    }

}
catch (InterruptedException e) {

}

not yet sure of the function of "join", I'll have to go to have a look at some book.

share|improve this question
1  
Dont't use Thread.stop(). It can leave shared data in an inconsistent state. If you're not going to use a Timer, I suggest you do what John V said. –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 16 '10 at 14:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suggest you use a Timer.

share|improve this answer
    
This is probably the right construct for whatever problem requires this capability. –  Amir Afghani Nov 15 '10 at 16:32
    
@Amir - I cannot argue with that! –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 15 '10 at 16:50
1  
done it, but I've used a ScheduledExecutorService.scheduleAtFixedRate. –  Andrew Strathclyde Nov 17 '10 at 14:01
    
That's probably a good call. Glad to help! –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 17 '10 at 14:22

The join method will wait the current thread until the thread that is being joined on finishes. The join with milliseconds passed in as a parameter will wait for some amount of time, if the time elapses notify the waiting thread and return.

What you can do, is after the join completes interrupt the thread you joined on. Of course this requires your thread to be responsive to thread interruption.

share|improve this answer
    
interrupt() only works if thread is waiting (is blocked by wait(..) or join(..)). –  Peter Knego Nov 15 '10 at 16:21
    
That is under the assumption you don't write code that handles interruption. You can easily have a check if(Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()){ thread.interrupt(); return; } –  John Vint Nov 15 '10 at 16:22
    
Please read: download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/… –  Peter Knego Nov 15 '10 at 16:24
1  
Not entirely: you need to check the flag with interrupted() (warrning: this clears the flag), AND handle InterruptedException. –  Peter Knego Nov 15 '10 at 16:40
1  
Though that is true, you are not taking into account my previous comment. I specifically said if he checks Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted() then he can assume the thread should be stopped. Its also important to know isInterrupted() does NOT effect the interruption status –  John Vint Nov 15 '10 at 16:45

Thread.join(milis) does not kill the thread. It just waits for the thread to end.

Java threading is cooperative: you can not stop or gracefully kill a thread without it's cooperation. One way to do it is to have an atomic flag (boolean field) that thread is checking and exiting if set.

share|improve this answer

Watchdog-Timers in Java are not a simple thing, since threading is cooperative. I remember that in one project we just used Thread.stop() although it is deprecated, but there was no elegant solution. We didn't face any issues using it, though.

A good example for a Java Watchdog implementation:

http://everything2.com/user/Pyrogenic/writeups/Watchdog+timer

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.