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How would I go about switching the main display XAML page that gets used in an XBAP. The only different is I want a larger mode and a smaller mode, but with the same controls (some hidden).

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your App.xaml.cs file, you can programmatically change which Window.xaml file you want to show on startup. Here is an over-simplified example.

protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnStartup(e);

    System.Windows.Window startupWindow = null;

    if(useLargeMode)
    {
         startupWindow = new LargeMainWindow();
    }
    else 
    {
        startupWindow = new SmallMainWindow();
    }
    window.Show();
}

You can also do this by changing the StartupUri in your App.xaml file but that is obviously going to be harder to change at runtime.

<Application x:Class="Main.App"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    StartupUri="MainWindow.xaml" /> <!-- change this -->

I've haven't tried binding to a property in the application declaration in the XAML, but VS 2010 doesn't complain about this. My concern would be that the app had it's datacontext set early enough for this to work correctly. Give it a try and let us know how it works. :)

<Application x:Class="Main.App"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    StartupUri="{Binding StartupWindow}">
share|improve this answer
    
I have MainWindow.xaml and MainSmallWindow.xaml. Using this method, could I link them to the same xmal.cs file without having to repeat code? – williamtroup Nov 16 '10 at 8:32
    
No, but you could have them both thunk all of their calls to a shared class that implements all of the logic, or you could derive a parent class from Window class and then have the common logic implemented in the shared parent class. – Dave White Nov 16 '10 at 16:59

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