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Let's say Class contains a reference called matrix_:

Class.h

class Class
{
Matrix& matrix_;
}

Class.cpp

Class::Class() : matrix_(Matrix())
{
}

I get the error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type ‘Matrix&’ from a temporary of type ‘Matrix’.

I see that the problem is that the temporary object will disappear and the reference will point to NULL. How can I create a persistent object for the reference? I want to use a reference because this member should be constant.

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you can't bind rvalue to non-const reference –  erjot Nov 15 '10 at 17:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Class::Class() : matrix_(Matrix()) tries to set the reference to point to a temporary object, which is illegal.

well, there's a case with const references and temporary binding, but seriously, don't go there.

Looks like you just need to use aggregation:

class Class
{
const Matrix matrix_;
};

And the initializer list:

Class::Class() : matrix_() /* or any params to the constructor if you need them */
{
}
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1  
+1 for keeping it simple :) You might want to add a semi-colon after the class definition (I'd do it for you, but not enough rep). Looks like a propagated error from the original question... –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 15 '10 at 20:36
    
I forgot that I can make it this easy. –  problemofficer Nov 16 '10 at 3:37
1  
@sgolodetz, Absolutely right, I'll fix this right away just for clarity. :) –  Kos Nov 16 '10 at 19:38

The Matrix reference must be provided as an argument of all constructors of Class.

class Class
{
  Matrix & matrix_;
public:
  Class(Matrix & matrix);
};

Class::Class(Matrix & matrix) : matrix_(matrix)
{
}

Note that although the reference will be constant (C++ references are constant pointers), the referenced Matrix will not, unless you add a const specifier.

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matrix_ is private so that is not an option ufortunately –  problemofficer Nov 15 '10 at 22:36

The problem is that references are not meant to be used for this. They are to be used more as an "alias" for something already existing. Be it an anonymous stack object (whose life is controlled by the codes scope) or a heap object with its own already existing pointer. In your case you are trying to use reference only for its constant property but forget that its more than a constant pointer.

The appropriate solution would be to use a constant pointer and allocate the new object on the heap like this:

Class.h

class Class
{
Matrix* const matrix_;
}

Class.cpp

Class::Class() : matrix_(new Matrix())
{
}
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I answered my own question because it came to me while thinking about the question and I wanted to share this with others faced with the same problem. I am not sure if it's correct though. –  problemofficer Nov 15 '10 at 17:48
5  
Or just create it as a value and forget about indirection. –  Peter Alexander Nov 15 '10 at 17:49

You don't have to use a reference for this member to be constant. You could use boost::scoped_ptr<const Matrix>.

class Class
{
public:
    Class();
private:
    boost::scoped_ptr<const Matrix> _matrix;
}

Class::Class() : _matrix(new Matrix)
{
}
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I'm curious as to why you suggest boost::scoped_ptr instead of std::auto_ptr? –  Flexo Nov 15 '10 at 17:55
    
@awoodland - purely habit, I rarely use auto_ptr –  Steve Townsend Nov 15 '10 at 17:56
    
I was worried there was some good reason to favour it over auto_ptr that I'd not noticed before –  Flexo Nov 15 '10 at 17:58
    
@awoodland - I think my aversion to auto_ptr stems from usage of the VC6 version (the one you can make a vector of). –  Steve Townsend Nov 15 '10 at 18:05
    
@awoodland: the semantics are slightly different, and using a scoped_ptr ensures that there is no generated operator= (If you use a std::auto_ptr and then write Class a, b; a = b; the compiler will gladly generate an assignment operator that releases the internal pointer in a, and then transfers ownership from b to a, leaving b empty handed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 15 '10 at 18:19

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