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This is my Java 1.6 class:

public class Foo {
  private ArrayList<String> names;
  public void scan() {
    if (names == null) {
      synchronized (this) {
        this.names = new ArrayList<String>();
        // fill the array with data
      }
    }
  }
}

Findbugs says:

Inconsistent synchronization of com.XXX.Foo.names; locked 40% of time

What does it mean and what I'm doing wrong? I'm trying to avoid problems when two or more clients call Foo.scan() at the same time.

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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's beacuse you are only synchronizing when you set the names variable and not when you read it. So between the read and the write another thread could execute and you'd create two ArrayLists and fill them with data, the first one created would get GC'ed.

You need to put the synchronized block around the read and the write or add the synchronized modifier to the method.

public class Foo {
  private ArrayList<String> names;
    public void scan() {
      synchronized (this)
        if (names == null) {
           this.names = new ArrayList<String>();
           // fill the array with data
         }
       }
     }
  }
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If you plan on using this idiom, the names variable should be marked volatile. –  Phil M Nov 15 '10 at 17:58
    
You should also check to see if names is null before you enter the sychrnoize block. This avoids locking when it's not necessary. –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 15 '10 at 18:10
    
@Phil M why should names be marked volatile? I thought that synchonized provides the same visibility as volatile. So you wouldnt be adding anything so long as all access to names uses the same lock. –  brain Nov 16 '10 at 9:18
    
If you're using the synchronized keyword, then you're expecting instances of class Foo to be shared between multiple threads. Reassignment of the names field in one thread will not necessarily be visible immediately (or at all) to other threads unless the field is marked volatile. See javamex.com/tutorials/… for detail. –  Phil M Nov 16 '10 at 15:53
    
If you are only accessing the variable from within the synchronized block, the variable does not need to be volatile. You should use volatile if you are accessing it from outside the synchronized block, and even then, it won't prevent (in this case, say) reading a null, while another thread is already in the synchronized block. –  Avi Nov 18 '10 at 6:25
show 4 more comments

The first time you reference names inside scan is outside of synchronized block.
E.g., if scan is called twice from two different threads and names is null, it may go like this

  1. if (names == null) from the first thread is processed (to true).
  2. if (names == null) from the second thread is processed (to true).
  3. First thread enters synchronized block, assignes names and leaves synchronized block.
  4. Second thread enters synchronized block, assignes names and leaves synchronized block.

Now, names is initialized twice. And this is only one possible scenario where you get unexpected results.

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locked 40% of time what does it stands for in warning –  Jigar Joshi Nov 15 '10 at 17:58
    
@org.life.java No idea, perhaps this is not the whole code. –  Nikita Rybak Nov 15 '10 at 18:07
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