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I'm attempting to use regexp to parse a search string that from time to time may contain special syntax. The syntax im looking for is [special keyword : value] and i want each match put into an array. Keep in mind that the search string will contain other text that is not intended to be parsed.

$searchString = "[StartDate:2010-11-01][EndDate:2010-11-31]";
$specialKeywords = array();
preg_match("/\[{1}.+\:{1}.+\]{1}/", $searchString, $specialKeywords);
var_dump($specialKeywords);

Output:

array(1) { [0]=> string(43) "[StartDate:2010-11-01] [EndDate:2010-11-31]" }

Desired Output:

array(2) { [0]=> string() "[StartDate:2010-11-01]"

[1]=> string() "[EndDate:2010-11-01]"}

Please let me know if i am not being clear enough.

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1  
The quantifier {1} is useless. –  Gumbo Nov 15 '10 at 17:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your .+ matches across the boundaries between the two [...] parts because it matches any character, and as many of them as possible. You could be more restrictive about which characters may be matched. Also {1} is redundant and can be dropped.

/\[[^:]*:[^\]]*\]/

should work more reliably.

Explanation:

\[     # match a [
[^:]*  # match any number of characters except :
:      # match a :
[^\]]* # match any number of characters except ]
\]     # match a ]
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Thank you this worked perfectly, i had to use the preg_match_all to get the array built correctly but the expression was spot on. Thanks again –  Steven Zurek Nov 15 '10 at 18:07
    
Can you go into a little more detail into the explanation. I'm confused how [^:]* = match any number of characters except :. Is the [^:]* matching all characters up until the : because the : is in the regex? –  Derek Adair Nov 15 '10 at 18:32
    
@Derek Adair: The [^:]* matches as many non-:-characters as it can, so it matches all characters up to (but not including) the :. This behaviour is independent from whether there is a : following in the regex or not - but of course it makes sense here. It also helps to match as quickly as possible because the regex engine never has to backtrack. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 15 '10 at 20:35
    
so [^something]* would match any number of characters that are not something until it reached something? –  Derek Adair Nov 15 '10 at 23:46
    
More or less, yes. [^abc]+ means "match one or more characters except a, b or c. So in abcdefcba it will match def. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 16 '10 at 6:37

This:

$searchString = "[StartDate:2010-11-01][EndDate:2010-11-31]";
preg_match_all('/\[.*?\]/', $searchString, $match);

print_r($match);

gives the expected result, I'm not sure if it matches all the constraints.

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Thank you for the response, the preg_match_all was a missing component but the expression from another answer was closer to what i was looking for. –  Steven Zurek Nov 15 '10 at 18:08

Try the following:

$searchString = "[StartDate:2010-11-01][EndDate:2010-11-31]";
$specialKeywords = array();
preg_match_all("/\[\w+:\d{4}-\d\d-\d\d\]/i", $searchString, $specialKeywords);

var_dump($specialKeywords[0]);

Outputs:

array(2) {
  [0]=>
  string(22) "[StartDate:2010-11-01]"
  [1]=>
  string(20) "[EndDate:2010-11-31]"
}
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He needs start/end date, not 2 end dates –  Webnet Nov 15 '10 at 17:59
    
@Webnet Yeeea, I should really look at the output before I copy/paste it into an answer. –  meagar Nov 15 '10 at 18:00
    
Thank you for the response, the problem i see with the expression you provided is that the value will not always be in Y-m-d format. –  Steven Zurek Nov 15 '10 at 18:09

Use this regex: "/\[(.*?)\:(.*?)\]{1}/" and also use preg_match_all, it will return

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(22) "[StartDate:2010-11-01]"
    [1]=>
    string(20) "[EndDate:2010-11-31]"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(9) "StartDate"
    [1]=>
    string(7) "EndDate"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(10) "2010-11-01"
    [1]=>
    string(10) "2010-11-31"
  }
}
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/\[.+?\:.+?\]/

I suggest this method, less complex but it handles the same as tim's

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