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I have an array with 1653 lines like this:

#define NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX 1653 * 3

static const float vertices[NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX] =
{
   {{2.4f, 0.5f, 0.0f}, {0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f} },
   ...
};

Which is the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX?

Thanks

UPDATE

I don't have idea about programming with C and you paid me with -3 points. Unbelievable

SECOND UPDATE I'm getting the following error:

warning: excess elements in scalar initializer
share|improve this question
    
It will be 1653 * sizeof (*your_array), don't you think? – codymanix Nov 15 '10 at 18:31
    
@codeymanix: No. You're looking at size of pointers, not size of the actual array. – Billy ONeal Nov 15 '10 at 18:32
    
I'm looking for the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:33
    
@Vans: There is no correct value for that. You have a multidimensional array and you're only declaring a single dimension. – Billy ONeal Nov 15 '10 at 18:33
4  
@VansFannel: several people have already tried to get a more precise idea of you want to know. You reply by basically always the same phrase. You don't even give us a context to guess something. What properties should the "right" value have? What is "size" for you? – Jens Gustedt Nov 15 '10 at 18:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

At least IMO, the right thing to do is simply leave NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX out entirely:

static const float vertices[] =
{
   {{2.4f, 0.5f, 0.0f}, {0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f} },
   ...
};

The compiler will then compute the size automatically based on the initialization data. To compute the size afterward, you can use something like:

#define elements(array) (sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]))

Note, however, that what you have doesn't really seem to be a multi-dimensional array at all (nor C's closest equivalent, an array of arrays). Since you only have one set of brackets, what you have is a single-dimension array. If you want to create it as a multi-dimension array, you could do something like:

static const float vertices[][3] =
{
   {{2.4f, 0.5f, 0.0f}, {0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f} },
   ...
};

Note the added [3] -- this tells the compiler that what you want is an array of arrays of three floats apiece. This will mean that vertices[0] will be the entire array of three floats that make up the first vertex, and vertices[0][1] will (at least conventionally) be the x value of the first vertex.

If you define the array this way, you can still use the elements macro above -- but since vertices[0] will be a complete vertex instead of a single float, the number of elements will be the number of vertices instead of the number of floats.

Based on the braces you've included, you may actually want it to be:

static const float lines[][2][3] = { /* ... */ };

Right now your bracing says you have pairs of vertices, and a pair of vertices defines a line...

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:57
    
Length of first dimension may be usable if one wants to have partially initialized array (least will be initialized using 0's). – Vovanium Nov 15 '10 at 21:15
float arr[1653][2][3];

It depends on what you mean by size. For total size it would be:

sizeof(float) * 1653 * 3 * 2

However, the best way to find the total size would just be:

sizeof(arr)

with arr being the array variable.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking for the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:32
    
If you are explicitly listing the elements, you do not specify the size. The length of the list of elements determines the array size. – Gavin H Nov 15 '10 at 18:37
    
This can be and asnwer. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 19:00

Have you tried using sizeof against the variable?

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I'm looking for the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:34

the number of elements in it is in the example you gave 2 but the memory it costs is much more (6 * sizeof(float)). Multiply these numbers with 1653 if you want to have the size of the complete array

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I'm looking for the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:36

It has two index sizes. 1653 and 3. Overall its index size is 1653*3.

The data size depends on what "packing" model (aka "stride") is being applied by the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
Size != dimension. (Also it's a 3d array) – Billy ONeal Nov 15 '10 at 18:29
    
@Billy ONeal: Or it could be a 2d array of struct {float x, y, z}. Or it could be a 1D array of struct {float x[3], y[3]}. Size should be the same either way, but it would help to know the actual array type. – John Bode Nov 15 '10 at 18:33
    
@John: Err.. no it can't. struct {float x, y, z} may well have a size greater than 3 * sizeof(float), because the compiler may insert padding. However, as an array, the compiler may not insert padding. – Billy ONeal Nov 15 '10 at 18:35
    
@Billy: right, I was simply going by what the OP had written at the time, which was "I have 1653 lines that look like {{...},{...}}"; everyone was making the assumption it had to be a 3D array, but based on what was written, other interpretations were possible. – John Bode Nov 15 '10 at 19:54

Depends on several things.

1) What do you mean by size? Do you mean number of elements in the array? Do you mean number of arrays held by your 2D array? Do you mean size in bytes of the whole array? Do you mean size of the pointer?

2) How big is a float on your system? You can find out with the sizeof() operator.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a 3d array, not a 2d array. – Billy ONeal Nov 15 '10 at 18:31
    
Right, good catch. – Ganon11 Nov 15 '10 at 18:33
    
I'm looking for the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:33

Size? Well... Depends on what you want to know.

sizeof arr is the size of array in bytes (well, in chars, to be precise, but that's the same on normal machines),

(sizeof arr / sizeof *arr) is the number of elements in the array - one element being a row of floats.

And about the number of actual floats inside, the simplest way is to just use sizeof arr / sizeof float for that.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking for the right value for NUM_POLYGON_OBJECT_VERTEX. – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:33
    
I don't have idea about programming with C and you paid me with -3 points. Unbelievable – VansFannel Nov 15 '10 at 18:42

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