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I would like to achieve a following communication between two threads:

Thread Alpha does something, and then suspends itself. Next the second thread(Beta) raises and event which resumes the Alpha thread. The cycle goes on...

I did something like below but I am not sure if it is a proper design. Also I've notice that Thread.Suspend() and Thread.Resume() are deprecated. I'm looking forward to hearing any advice about this implementation and what is preferred to replace deprecated methods.

namespace ThreadTester
{
    delegate void ActionHandler();

    class Alpha
    {
        internal Thread alphaThread;
        internal void Start()
        {
            while (true)
            {
                this.alphaThread.Suspend();
                Console.WriteLine("Alpha");
            }
        }
        internal void Resume()
        {
            while (this.alphaThread.ThreadState == ThreadState.Suspended)
            this.alphaThread.Resume();
        }
    }

    class Beta
    {
        internal event ActionHandler OnEvent;
        internal void Start()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++)
            {
                OnEvent();
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Alpha alpha = new Alpha();
            alpha.alphaThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(alpha.Start));
            alpha.alphaThread.Start();
            while (!alpha.alphaThread.IsAlive) ;

            Beta beta = new Beta();
            beta.OnEvent += new ActionHandler(alpha.Resume);
            Thread betaThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(beta.Start));
            betaThread.Start();
        }
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Typically threads are used to allow > 1 item of work to be processed in parallel. I'm curious about why your design requires thread A to sleep while thread B does something, then wake up and carry on working. Why not just have Thread A do that work itself?

You might benefit from using .Net 4's Task Parallel Library - Thread A could then initiate an asynchronous Task which is automagically executed on a separate thread, and the result made available to Thread A without the need for explicit inter-thread signalling (which can result in a hung app if either Thread A or B malfunctions).

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This is where you typically use wait handles, in particular event wait handles.

If you call the WaitOne method on a wait handle, it will block your thread until some other thread calls Set on the same wait handle.

There are two important simple flavors of event wait handles: AutoResetEvent will automatically reset itself after a thread passes through WaitOne. ManualResetEvent will only reset itself if you call Reset.

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This is a common synchronization problem and there are several approaches (all of which are pretty easy to mess up, if you're not extremely careful):

  1. Wait Handles (Joren has already described these).

  2. Monitor.Wait and Monitor.Pulse. One gotcha here is that the Pulse will only wake up threads that are already in the Wait state, so you have to be careful how you manage the locking of the synchronization object.

  3. With the new TPL in .NET 4 (also back-ported to .NET 3.5), you can set up asynchronous Tasks and define conditions where Tasks continue based on previously completed tasks. There's a bit of a learning curve to understanding how to structure your code to take advantage of Tasks and continuation, but it's considerably better (in the long run) than the very rocky road that follows the deceptively simple use of the lower-level synchronization constructs. This also gives you an excellent path forward for adding more robust error handling and cancellation support to your logic, as the nitty-gritty details of coordinating these is baked into the TPL.

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Your code has the "feel" of the producer-consumer pattern, but implemented in the wrong way. You definitely do not want to use Thread.Suspend and Thread.Resume in this manner (or any manner actually). It is actually easy to get the sequencing and the signalling the way you want by implementing the canonical producer-consumer pattern via the BlockingCollection class.

public class ProducerConsumer
{
    private BlockingCollection<object> m_Queue = new BlockingCollection<object>();

    public ProducerConsumer()
    {
        new Thread(Producer).Start();
        new Thread(Consumer).Start();
    }

    private void Consumer()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            object item = m_Queue.Take(); // blocks when the queue is empty
            Console.WriteLine("Consumer");
        }
    }

    private void Producer()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            m_Queue.Add(new object());
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
    }
}

In the above code Consumer and Producer would be equivalent to your alphaThread and betaThread respectively.

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This is probably closest to answering the real intent of the question, though it's hard to be sure. The new BlockingCollection is definitely a better way to implement this simple Producer-Consumer pattern than using low-level synchronization constructs directly. That said, I'd advise the OP to use this pattern cautiously, as I've seen it get way out of hand (I've seen at least one application with dozens of threads all running their own Producer-Consumer 'message' handler [with three completely different homegrown implementations of the pattern, no less].) –  Dan Bryant Nov 16 '10 at 1:05

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