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I have a Silverlight app. that has a basic animation where a rectangle is animated to a new position. The animation consists of two DoubleAnimation() - one transforms the X, the other transforms the Y. It works OK.

I basically want to block any other calls to this animate method until the first two animations have completed. I see that the DoubleAnimation() class has a Completed event it fires but I haven't been successful in constructing any kind of code that successfully blocks until both have completed.

I attempted to use Monitor.Enter on a private member when entering the method, then releasing the lock from one of the animations Completed event, but my attempts at chaining the two events (so the lock isn't released until both have completed) haven't been successful.

Here's what the animation method looks like:

    public void AnimateRectangle(Rectangle rect, double newX, double newY)
    {
            var xIsComplete = false;

            Duration duration = new Duration(new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 1, 350));
            var easing = new ElasticEase() { EasingMode = EasingMode.EaseOut, Oscillations = 1, Springiness = 4 };
            var animateX = new DoubleAnimation();
            var animateY = new DoubleAnimation();

            animateX.EasingFunction = easing;
            animateX.Duration = duration;
            animateY.EasingFunction = easing;
            animateY.Duration = duration;

            var sb = new Storyboard();

            sb.Duration = duration;
            sb.Children.Add(animateX);
            sb.Children.Add(animateY);

            Storyboard.SetTarget(animateX, rect);
            Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(animateX, new PropertyPath("(Canvas.Left)"));
            Storyboard.SetTarget(animateY, rect);
            Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(animateY, new PropertyPath("(Canvas.Top)"));

            animateX.To = newX;
            animateY.To = newY;
            sb.Begin();

    }

EDIT (added more info)

I ran into this initially because I was calling this method from another method (as it processed items it made a call to the animation). I noticed that the items didn't end up where I expected them to. The new X/Y coordinates I pass in are based on the items current location, so if it was called multiple times before it finished, it ended up in the wrong location. As a test I added a button that only ran the animation once. It worked. However, if I click on the button a bunch of times in a row I see the same behavior as before: items end up in the wrong location.

Yes, it appears Silverlight animations are run on the main UI thread. One of the tests I tried I added two properties that flagged whether both animations had completed yet. In the AnimateRectange() method I checked them inside of a while loop (calling Thread.Sleep). This loop never completed (so it's definitely on the same thread).

So I created a queue to process the animations in order:

    private void ProcessAnimationQueue()
    {
        var items = this.m_animationQueue.GetEnumerator();
        while (items.MoveNext())
        {
            while (this.m_isXanimationInProgress || this.m_isYanimationInProgress)
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
            }

            var item = items.Current;
            Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => this.AnimateRectangle(item.Rect.Rect, item.X, item.Y));                
        }
    }

Then I call my initial routine (which queues up the animations) and call this method on a new thread. I see the same results.

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2 Answers 2

As far as I am aware all of the animations in Silverlight are happening on the UI thread anyway. I am guessing that only the UI thread is calling this animation function anyway, so I am not sure that using locking will help. Do you really want to be blocking the entire thread or just preventing another animation from starting?

I would suggest something more like this:

private bool isAnimating = false;

public void AnimateRectangle(Rectangle rect, double newX, double newY)
{
    if (isAnimating)
        return;

    // rest of animation code

    sb.Completed += (sender, e) =>
    {
        isAnimating = false;
    };

    isAnimating = true;
    sb.Begin();
}

Just keep track of whether or not you are currently animating with a flag and return early if you are. If you don't want to lose potential animations your other option is to keep some kind of a queue for animation which you could check/start when each animation has completed.

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This question really peaked my interest. In fact I'm going to include it in my next blog post.

Boiling it down, just to be sure we are talking about the same thing, fundementally you don't want to block the call to AnimateRectangle you just want to "queue" the call so that once any outstanding call has completed its animation this "queued" call gets executed. By extension you may need to queue several calls if a previous call hasn't even started yet.

So we need two things:-

  1. A means to treat what are essentially asynchronous operations (sb.Begin to Completed event) as a sequential operation, one operation only starting when the previous has completed.
  2. A means to queue additional operations when one or more operations are yet to complete.

AsyncOperationService

Item 1 comes up in a zillion different ways in Silverlight due to the asynchronous nature of so many things. I solve this issue with a simple asynchronous operation runner blogged here. Add the AsyncOperationService code to your project.

AsyncOperationQueue

Its item 2 that really took my interest. The variation here is that whilst an existing set of operations are in progress there is demand to add another. For a general case solution we'd need a thread-safe means of including another operation.

Here is the bare-bones of a AsyncOperationQueue:-

public class AsyncOperationQueue
{
    readonly Queue<AsyncOperation> myQueue = new Queue<AsyncOperation>();
    AsyncOperation myCurrentOp = null;

    public void Enqueue(AsyncOperation op)
    {
        bool start = false;

        lock (myQueue)
        {
            if (myCurrentOp != null)
            {
                myQueue.Enqueue(op);
            }
            else
            {
                myCurrentOp = op;
                start = true;
            }
        }

        if (start)
            DequeueOps().Run(delegate { });
    }

    private AsyncOperation GetNextOperation()
    {
        lock (myQueue)
        {
            myCurrentOp = (myQueue.Count > 0) ? myQueue.Dequeue() : null;
            return myCurrentOp;
        }
    }

    private IEnumerable<AsyncOperation> DequeueOps()
    {
        AsyncOperation nextOp = myCurrentOp;
        while (nextOp != null)
        {
            yield return nextOp;
            nextOp = GetNextOperation();
        }
    }
}

Putting it to use

First thing to do is convert your existing AnimateRectangle method into a GetAnimateRectangleOp that returns a AsyncOperation. Like this:-

    public AsyncOperation GetAnimateRectangleOp(Rectangle rect, double newX, double newY)
    {
        return (completed) =>
        {
            // Code identical to the body of your original AnimateRectangle method.
            sb.Begin();

            sb.Completed += (s, args) => completed(null);
        };

    }

We need to hold an instance of the AsyncOperationQueue:-

 private AsyncOperationQueue myAnimationQueue = new AsyncOperationQueue();

Finally we need to re-create AnimateRectangle that enqueues the operation to the queue:-

 public void AnimateRectangle(Rectangle rect, double newX, double newY)  
 {
     myAnimationQueue.Enqueue(GetAnimateRectangleOp(rect, newX, newY)
 }
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