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Are there any open-source tools available which support searching for Java methods by the set of parameter types and return type?

As an example, say I'm looking for a method to generate a hash code for an array of ints. I search for a method which takes an int[] parameter and returns an int:

int[] -> int

yielding

java.util.Arrays#hashCode(int[])
...

Or I may want to find a method which takes a String, and character to replace, and the character to replace it with. So I search for a matching method:

String, char, char -> String

yielding

java.lang.String#replace(char, char)
...

Ideally I'd like a Java equivalent to Haskell's Hoogle, which supports searching for functions by type signature.

I'd expect the tool to:

  • ignore the order of parameters
  • include methods which accept 'wider' types as parameters (e.g. superclasses)
  • include methods which return 'narrower' types as return values (e.g. subclasses)
  • treat the 'self' value as a parameter to instance methods (e.g. 'String -> int' would include String#hashCode)

I'm aware that many IDEs support searching for methods which take or return a given type, but haven't yet seen a tool to narrow the search by the combination of parameter types and return type.

share|improve this question
    
There are probably 10s of thousands of methods that take an array of ints and return an int. –  Falmarri Nov 15 '10 at 22:12
    
At codase.com you can specify return type and method parameters. But I assume you are looking for a search engine integrated to your favourite IDE –  mhaller Nov 15 '10 at 22:55
    
@Falmarri Yes, results would need to be prioritised to be of any use. E.g. giving higher weight to methods in the standard libraries, or methods which more closely match the exact types specified. –  mattbh Nov 16 '10 at 23:01
    
@mhaller A web service would be fine, as long as we could run our own instance and index our own code base. codase.com is the closest I've seen for Java (thanks!); I'm looking for something like that, which also provides those features listed above (e.g. ignoring argument order). –  mattbh Nov 16 '10 at 23:06
    
This was a fun problem - I'm on it! :) –  dacwe Nov 17 '10 at 7:57
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Solution comments:

  1. Ignoring order, all permutation of parameters are tested till a match of a given function is found
  2. Primitive types are interchangeable (eg Integer.class = Integer.TYPE)
  3. Checks wider parameters
  4. Return types can be narrower
  5. Self is treated as first of the arguments to the findMethod method

This is the output of the program:

int[] -> Integer
    public native int java.lang.Object.hashCode()
    public static native int java.lang.reflect.Array.getLength(java.lang.Object) throws java.lang.IllegalArgumentException
    public static int java.util.Arrays.hashCode(int[])
    public static native int java.lang.System.identityHashCode(java.lang.Object)

String, Character, Character -> String
    public java.lang.String java.lang.String.replace(char,char)

String -> Integer
    public int java.lang.String.hashCode()
    public int java.lang.String.length()
    public static native int java.lang.reflect.Array.getLength(java.lang.Object) throws java.lang.IllegalArgumentException
    public static java.lang.Integer java.lang.Integer.decode(java.lang.String) throws java.lang.NumberFormatException
    public static java.lang.Integer java.lang.Integer.valueOf(java.lang.String) throws java.lang.NumberFormatException
    public static int java.lang.Integer.parseInt(java.lang.String) throws java.lang.NumberFormatException
    public static java.lang.Integer java.lang.Integer.getInteger(java.lang.String)
    public static native int java.lang.System.identityHashCode(java.lang.Object)

List -> Void
    public abstract void java.util.List.clear()
    public static void java.util.concurrent.locks.LockSupport.park(java.lang.Object)
    public static void java.util.Collections.reverse(java.util.List)
    public static void java.util.Collections.shuffle(java.util.List)
    public static void java.util.Collections.sort(java.util.List)

The code:

public class MethodMatcher {

    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {

        // where to load some classes from (could be a list of classes to 
        // search from)..
        //        String pathToJar = "/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun-1.6.0.22/jre/lib/rt.jar";
        String pathToJar = "C:\\Program Files\\Java\\jdk1.6.0_20\\jre\\lib\\rt.jar";

        MethodMatcher m = new MethodMatcher(pathToJar, 
                "java.io", "java.lang", "java.math", "java.net", 
                "java.nio", "java.text", "java.util");

        // print some examples
        m.printExampleSearch(Integer.class, new int[0].getClass());
        m.printExampleSearch(String.class, String.class, Character.class, Character.class);
        m.printExampleSearch(Integer.class, String.class);
        m.printExampleSearch(Void.class, List.class);
    }

    public void printExampleSearch(Class<?> returnType, Class<?>... arguments) {

        for (int i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++)
            System.out.print((i == 0 ? "":", ") + arguments[i].getSimpleName());

        System.out.println(" -> " + returnType.getSimpleName());

        Set<Method> methods = findMethods(returnType, arguments);

        for (Method method : methods)
            System.out.println("\t" + method);

        System.out.println();
    }



    private final List<MethodFinder> klasses;

    public MethodMatcher(String jarFile, String... allowedPackages) 
    throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException {

        klasses = loadClasses(jarFile, allowedPackages);
    }

    /**
     * Finds a set of methods
     * @param returnType the return type
     * @param arguments the arguments (in any order)
     * @return a set of methods
     */
    public Set<Method> findMethods(Class<?> returnType,
            Class<?>... arguments) {

        Set<Method> methods = new LinkedHashSet<Method>();

        if (arguments.length > 0) {
            MethodFinder instance = new MethodFinder(arguments[0]);

            Class<?>[] rest = new Class<?>[arguments.length - 1];
            System.arraycopy(arguments, 1, rest, 0, rest.length);

            methods.addAll(instance.findInstanceMethods(returnType, rest));
        }
        else {
            for (MethodFinder k : klasses)
                methods.addAll(k.findInstanceMethods(returnType, arguments));
        }

        for (MethodFinder k : klasses)
            methods.addAll(k.findStaticMethods(returnType, arguments));

        return methods;
    }

    /**
     * A method finder class
     */
    static class MethodFinder {

        public final Class<?> klass;

        /**
         * Constructs the method finder (doh)
         * @param klass the class
         */
        public MethodFinder(Class<?> klass) {
            this.klass = klass;
        }

        /**
         * Finds instance method matches
         * @param returnType the return type
         * @param arguments the arguments (in any order)
         * @return
         */
        public List<Method> findInstanceMethods(Class<?> returnType, 
                Class<?>... arguments) {

            List<Method> matches = new LinkedList<Method>();

            for (Method method : klass.getMethods()) {
                if ((method.getModifiers() & Modifier.STATIC) == 0) 
                    if (testMethod(method, returnType, arguments))
                        matches.add(method);
            }

            return matches;        
        }

        /**
         * Finds static method matches
         * @param returnType the return type
         * @param arguments the arguments (in any order)
         * @return
         */
        public List<Method> findStaticMethods(Class<?> returnType,
                Class<?>... arguments) {

            List<Method> matches = new LinkedList<Method>();

            for (Method method : klass.getMethods()) 
                if ((method.getModifiers() & Modifier.STATIC) != 0) 
                    if (testMethod(method, returnType, arguments))
                        matches.add(method);

            return matches;        
        }

        /**
         * Tests a method if it is a match
         * @param method the method to test
         * @param returnType the return type
         * @param arguments the arguments (in any order)
         * @return true if it matches
         */
        private boolean testMethod(Method method, 
                Class<?> returnType, 
                Class<?>... arguments) {

            boolean returnTypeIsOk = false;
            for (Class<?> ic : getInterchangable(returnType))
                if (ic.isAssignableFrom(method.getReturnType()))
                    returnTypeIsOk = true;

            if (!returnTypeIsOk)
                return false;

            Class<?>[] methodArguments = method.getParameterTypes();

            if (methodArguments.length != arguments.length)
                return false;

            if (methodArguments.length == 0) {
                return true;
            }
            else {
                Permutations permutations = new Permutations(arguments);

                outer: for (Class<?>[] permutation : permutations) {
                    for (int i = 0; i < methodArguments.length; i++) {

                        boolean canAssign = false;
                        for (Class<?> ic : getInterchangable(permutation[i])) 
                            if (methodArguments[i].isAssignableFrom(ic))
                                canAssign = true;

                        if (!canAssign)
                            continue outer;
                    }
                    return true;
                }

                return false;
            }
        }

        /**
         * Returns the autoboxing types
         * @param type the type to autobox :)
         * @return a list of types that it could be
         */
        private static Class<?>[] getInterchangable(Class<?> type) {

            if (type == Boolean.class || type == Boolean.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Boolean.class, Boolean.TYPE };
            if (type == Character.class || type == Character.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Character.class, Character.TYPE };
            if (type == Short.class || type == Short.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Short.class, Short.TYPE };
            if (type == Integer.class || type == Integer.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Integer.class, Integer.TYPE };
            if (type == Float.class || type == Float.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Float.class, Float.TYPE };
            if (type == Double.class || type == Double.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Double.class, Double.TYPE };
            if (type == Void.class || type == Void.TYPE)
                return new Class<?>[] { Void.class, Void.TYPE };

            return new Class<?>[] { type };
        }


        /**
         * Creates a permutation list of all different combinations
         */
        @SuppressWarnings("serial")
        private class Permutations extends LinkedList<Class<?>[]> {

            /**
             * Creates a permutation list
             * @param list the list to be permutated
             */
            public Permutations(Class<?>[] list) {
                permutate(new LinkedList<Class<?>>(Arrays.asList(list)),
                        new LinkedList<Class<?>>());
            }

            // ugly, there is better ways of doing this...
            private void permutate(List<Class<?>> tail, List<Class<?>> choosen) {

                if (tail.isEmpty()) {
                    add(choosen.toArray(new Class<?>[0]));
                    return;
                }

                ListIterator<Class<?>> it = tail.listIterator();

                while (it.hasNext()) {

                    Class<?> current = it.next();

                    choosen.add(current);
                    it.remove();

                    permutate(new LinkedList<Class<?>>(tail), choosen);

                    choosen.remove(current);
                    it.add(current);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * A hack to read some classes from some allowed packages
     * @param jarFile the jar file to read from
     * @param allowedPackages the allowed packages
     * @return a list of MethodFinders
     * @throws IOException
     * @throws ClassNotFoundException
     */
    private static List<MethodFinder> loadClasses(
            String jarFile, 
            String... allowedPackages) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException {

        List<MethodFinder> klasses = new LinkedList<MethodFinder>();

        JarFile file = new JarFile(jarFile);
        try {
            Enumeration<JarEntry> enumerator = file.entries();

            while (enumerator.hasMoreElements()) {

                String name = enumerator.nextElement().getName();

                if (!name.endsWith(".class")) 
                    continue;

                name = name.substring(0, name.length() - 6).replace('/', '.');

                boolean allowed = false;
                for (String pkg : allowedPackages)
                    allowed |= name.startsWith(pkg);

                if (allowed)
                    klasses.add(new MethodFinder(Class.forName(name)));
            }
        } 
        finally {
            if (file != null)
                file.close();
        }

        return klasses;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice work! Would you mind specifying what license you're sharing it under? BSD-style would make it easy to share. Thanks for taking the time to write it! –  mattbh Nov 17 '10 at 20:10
    
Hum, use it as you want, but link to this post if you want! :) –  dacwe Dec 7 '10 at 9:18
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Very good question although I do not understand why do you need such tool. I am sorry to say it but it seems that it takes less time to implement such tool than to write this post. Here is a code that I have just implemented. It took 182 seconds. It is a static method that takes class, return type and arguments and returns all method of the class that match the signature.

import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class ClassUtil {
    public static Method[] getMethodsBySignature(Class<?> clazz, Class<?> returnType, Class<?>... args) {
        List<Method> result = new ArrayList<Method>();
        for (Method m : clazz.getDeclaredMethods()) {
            if (m.getReturnType().equals(returnType)) {
                Class<?>[] params = m.getParameterTypes();
                if (Arrays.equals(params, args)) {
                    result.add(m);
                }
            }
        }
        return result.toArray(new Method[result.size()]);
    }
}

You can spend another 5-10 minutes to implement method that opens jar, iterates over entries, calls Class.forName() and then calls my method. That's it!

share|improve this answer
    
What are you doing that allows you to so accurately time yourself? Is it part of a GTD method? –  Tom Neyland Nov 15 '10 at 22:50
1  
Thanks, but that doesn't cover the features I posted above. I'd also expect it to do efficient searches (i.e. maintaining an index), rather than do a linear search for each query. –  mattbh Nov 16 '10 at 22:30
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I just tried this on Eclipse (Helios) and it supports this. Hit Ctrl-H, go to Java tab, choose Search For -> Method radio button, Limit To -> Declarations. In the Search string enter *(int, int) int and it will return lots of results of methods that take two ints and return an int.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that sounds great! Hopefully something similar will make its way into IntelliJ IDEA. –  mattbh May 25 '11 at 2:06
    
How to get ALL the methods that have as first argument an int, for instance? Your example only captures methods that have EXACTLY 2 ints as arguments :( –  devoured elysium Jan 27 '12 at 8:47
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