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I'm learning Python, and I have a situation where I want to consume items from an iterator. The tricky part is that under certain conditions, I want to "un-iterate." That is, put an item back onto the front of the iterator before I loop.

For example, suppose I'm picking apples from a tree. My fruit basket can only hold 10kg before it needs to be emptied. But I have to pick each apple before I can weigh it and determine if this apple would exceed the capacity of the basket.

In a language like Perl, I could unshift() the apple back onto the tree, and then let the loop expression re-pick the apple:

while ($apple = shift(@tree)) {
  $wt = weight($apple);
  if ($wt + weight(@basket) > 10) {
    send(@basket);
    @basket = ();
    unshift(@tree, $apple);
  } else {
    push(@basket, $element);
  }
}

Or else I can also use redo, which resumes processing at the top of block, without evaluating the loop expression. So the same apple can be re-processed, after the basket has been emptied.

while ($apple = shift(@tree)) {
  $wt = weight($apple);
  if ($wt + weight(@basket) > 10) {
    send(@basket);
    @basket = ();
    redo;
  } else {
    push(@basket, $apple);
  }
}

What would be the most pythonic solution for this kind of problem?

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if $wt > 10 then there is an infinite loop (the first example eats all memory, the second one just never halts). –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 8 '09 at 20:48
    
@J.F.: You're right, but in this case it's safe to assume no single apple will exceed 10kg. –  Bill Karwin Jan 8 '09 at 22:46
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9 Answers 9

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Why bother with unshifting when the else clause should always occur?

for apple in tree:
    if (apple.weight + basket.weight) > 10:
       send(basket)
       basket.clear()
    basket.add(apple)

Anyway, I'm fairly certain that Python doesn't have the sort of behavior you're looking for.

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1  
Just to clarify: Python's builtin iterators don't have the sort of behavior he's looking for. –  cdleary Jan 7 '09 at 19:45
    
I've changed the code style. Feel free to roll back. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 7 '09 at 20:47
    
This appears to be the most straightforward solution. Thanks! –  Bill Karwin Jan 10 '09 at 2:26
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I'm learning Python, and I have a situation where I want to consume items from an iterator. The tricky part is that under certain conditions, I want to "un-iterate." That is, put an item back onto the front of the iterator before I loop.

Here's a simple solution:

class MyIterator(object):   # undo-able iterator wrapper
    def __init__(self, iterable):
    	super(MyIterator, self).__init__()
    	self.iterator = iter(iterable)
    	self.stack = []

    def __iter__(self):
    	return self

    def next(self):
    	if self.stack:
    		return self.stack.pop()
    	return self.iterator.next()  # Raises StopIteration eventually

    def undo(self, item):
    	self.stack.append(item)
for i in  MyIterator(xrange(5)): print i
0
1
2
3
4
rng = MyIterator(xrange(5))
rng.next()
0
rng.next()
1
rng.undo(1)
rng.next()
1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this answers my original question about how one could implement an unshift-like operation. –  Bill Karwin Jan 10 '09 at 2:27
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I'd say that the most Pythonic solution is the simplest one. Instead of trying to wrap an iterator in a generator expression that allows you to "backtrack" or something similarly complex, use a while loop, as you have in Perl! Iterators don't mix very nicely with mutation, anywho.

Simple translation of your implementation (ignoring @Patrick's optimization):

while tree:
    apple = tree.pop(0)
    if apple.weight + basket.weight > 10:
        basket.send()
        basket.clear()
        tree.insert(0, apple) # Put it back.
    else:
        basket.append(apple)

Or, you could use a peek-like functionality with ordered sequence indices:

while tree:
    apple = tree[0] # Take a peek at it.
    if apple.weight + basket.weight > 10:
        basket.send()
        basket.clear()
    else:
        basket.append(tree.pop(0))

If you don't like the "simple" argument, check out the collections.deque iterators mentioned in the above (linked) thread.

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1  
Thanks, it's good to remember to step back from the problem. Instead of focusing on a mechanism like unshift, it's best to solve the true problem in a more simple way. –  Bill Karwin Jan 10 '09 at 2:29
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If you don't want to follow the other's suggestion of just removing the else clause, you can write your own unshift function that will work in a way similar to perl's with any iterable:

class UnshiftableIterable(object):
    def __init__(self, iterable):
        self._iter = iter(iterable)
        self._unshifted = [] # empty list of unshifted stuff
    def __iter__(self):
        while True:
            if self._unshifted:
                yield self._unshifted.pop()
            else:
                yield self._iter.next()
    def unshift(self, item):
        self._unshifted.append(item)

Then in your code:

it = UnshiftableIterable(tree)
for apple in tree:
    if weigth(basket) + weight(apple) > MAX_WEIGHT:
        send(basket)
        basket = []
        it.unshift(apple)
    else:
        basket.append(apple)

Some testing of the UnshiftableIterable:

it = UnshiftableIterable(xrange(5))

for i in it:
    print '*',
    if i == 2:
        it.unshift(10)
    else:
        print i,
# output: * 0 * 1 * * 10 * 3 * 4
share|improve this answer
    
Your UnshiftableIterator is not an iterator (it has no next() method). It is iterable (it has __iter__() method). –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 7 '09 at 20:53
    
@J.F.Sebastian: True. Changed name to reflect that. –  nosklo Jan 8 '09 at 13:50
    
for apple in tree: -> for apple in it:. Otherwise unshifted values are never used. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 8 '09 at 16:11
    
Thanks for the example. It's good to see how to create an iterable class, even if I don't use this solution in this particular case. –  Bill Karwin Jan 10 '09 at 2:30
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You're looking for a generator, an iterator that can receive modifications to its internal state via the send() method

http://www.python.org/doc/current/howto/functional.html#passing-values-into-a-generator

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Thanks for this tip about send()! I'm not sure I'll use it in this case, but it's great to know for the future. –  Bill Karwin Jan 10 '09 at 2:28
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While I was writing this @Patrick already suggested the same thing. But since I have written it I will paste the code anyways, with comments in code marking methods from Patrick.

import random

apples=[random.randint(1,3) for j in range(10)]
print 'apples',apples

basket=[]
y=6
baskets=[]

for i in range(len(apples)):
    if sum(basket+[apples[i]])>y:
        #basket is full                                                                                                                                     
        baskets.append(basket)#basket.send()                                                                                                                
        basket=[]#basket.empty()                                                                                                                            
    basket.append(apples[i])#add apple to basket                                                                                                            

print 'baskets',baskets

though this does not pop() the apples from the original iterator. Please remark if that's a desired behavior too.

the output

apples [1, 1, 3, 3, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3]
baskets [[1, 1, 3], [3, 1, 1], [3, 3]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the example! –  Bill Karwin Jan 10 '09 at 2:31
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By the way, what you really want is list.insert(0,yourObject)

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Back to the original question about impementing unshift, operator.delitem can be used to implement a simple non-OO function:

from operator import delitem

def unshift(l,idx):
    retval = l[0]
    delitem(l,0)
    return retval

x = [2,4,6,8]

firstval = unshift(x,0)

print firstval,x

2 [4, 6, 8]

share|improve this answer
    
That's not unshift -- that's shift. –  Bill Karwin Feb 7 '13 at 2:03
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There is no way general way to push a value into an iterator in python. A stack or linked list is better suited to that.

If you're iterating over a list or something, of course you can add the item manually back to the list. But you can also iterate over objects which can't be manipulated in such a way.

If you want to use python to implement that algorithm, you'll have to choose a data structure that allows the operations you want to use. I suggest the .push() and .pop() methods which let you treat lists as stacks.

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