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I have a generated txt file. This file has certain lines that are superfluous, and need to be removed. Each line that requires removal has one of two string in the line; "ERROR" or "REFERENCE". These tokens may appear anywhere in the line. I would like to delete these lines, while retaining all other lines.

So, if the txt file looks like this:

Good Line of data
bad line of C:\Directory\ERROR\myFile.dll
Another good line of data
bad line: REFERENCE 
Good line

I would like the file to end up like this:

Good Line of data
Another good line of data
Good line

TIA.

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Had this exact problem and found it here on SO. God bless Stack Overflow!! –  Matt Rogish May 8 '09 at 19:55
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4 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Use the following:

type file.txt | findstr /v ERROR | findstr /v REFERENCE

This has the advantage of using standard tools in the Windows OS, rather than having to find and install sed/awk/perl and such.

See the following transcript for it in operation:

C:\>type file.txt
Good Line of data
bad line of C:\Directory\ERROR\myFile.dll
Another good line of data
bad line: REFERENCE
Good line

C:\>type file.txt | findstr /v ERROR | findstr /v REFERENCE
Good Line of data
Another good line of data
Good line
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Great, just the line I was looking for. –  chrome Jan 7 '09 at 15:37
3  
Had this exact problem and found it here on SO. God bless Stack Overflow!! –  Matt Rogish May 8 '09 at 19:55
7  
To be complete: you need to add "> output.txt" (without quotes) to have the output written in a file. –  Burkhard Sep 14 '09 at 18:37
    
Thanks, this was quick and easy just the way I like it! –  Bob Aug 3 '10 at 15:10
2  
thanks, this helped me out but a word of caution, I had some issues with phrases including spaces and had to use /c: so the command would look like this: type file.txt | findstr /v /c:"ERROR" | findstr /v /c:"REFERENCE". Also if you need to strip lines off that you know are at the top fo the file, pipe it through more +<n> where <n> is the number of lines to strip off. –  Apeiron Nov 12 '11 at 0:21
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If you have sed:

sed -e '/REFERENCE/d' -e '/ERROR/d' [FILENAME]

Where FILENAME is the name of the text file with the good & bad lines

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You can accomplish the same solution as @paxdiablo's using just findstr by itself. There's no need to pipe multiple commands together:

findstr /v "ERROR REFERENCE" infile.txt > outfile.txt

Details of how this works:

  • /v finds lines that don't match the search string (same switch @paxdiablo uses)
  • if the search string is in quotes, it performs an OR search, using each word (separator is a space)
  • findstr can take an input file, you don't need to feed it the text using the "type" command
  • "> outfile.txt" will send the results to the file outfile.txt instead printing them to your console. (Note that it will overwrite the file if it exists. Use ">> outfile.txt" instead if you want to append.)
  • You might also consider adding the /i switch to do a case-insensitive match.
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type !INSTALLED_APPS! | findstr /v "@ //" > temp_filter_out_junk.txt >nul 2>&1 –  Mike Q Aug 20 '13 at 21:32
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If you have perl installed, then perl -i -n -e"print unless m{(ERROR|REFERENCE)}" should do the trick.

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