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I've two template classes: Class1< S > and Class2< T >. In Class2< T >, there's a method that has as parameter a pointer to an object of Class1< S >. Should I then re-define class2< T > to class2< S, T >? or is there any other best solution? The problem, is that I might have new methods referring to objects of other template classes as parameters. Therefore, I would to avoid having sth. like: class2< S, T , U ...>

template < class S >
class Class1{
    public:
        ...
    private:
        ...
};

template < class T >
class Class2{
    public:
        ...
        Class2<T> * doSomething(Class1<S> * );
        ...
    private:
        ...
};

template < class S, class T >
class Class2{
    public:
        ...
        Class2<T> * doSomething(Class1<S> * );
        ...
    private:
        ...
};
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The type of object that Class2::doSomething acts upon should not have to be part of Class2's type. So make Class2::doSomething() a Member Function Template:

template < class T >
class Class2{
    public:
        ...
        template<class S> Class2<T> * doSomething(Class1<S> * );
        ...
    private:
        ...
};

EDIT:

Defining the member function template is easy enough if you do it inline, but sometimes you can't or don't want to do that, and then some funky syntax comes in to play. Here's a complete example that illustrates both how to define the member function template, and how to call it. I've changed the names to be a little easier to read & follow.

template<class FooType> class Foo
{
};

template<class BarType> class Bar
{
public:
    template<class FooType> Bar<BarType>* doSomething(Foo<FooType>* foo);
};

template<typename BarType> template<typename FooType> Bar<BarType>* Bar<BarType>::doSomething(Foo<FooType>* foo)
{
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    Foo<unsigned> foo_1;
    Bar<double> bar_1;
    Bar<double> * bar_copy = 0;
    bar_copy = bar_1.doSomething<unsigned>(&foo_1);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. And when I initialize/use the objects, it would be sth. like: Class1<int> objClass1; Class2<float> objC2_1, *objC2_2; objC2_2 = objC2_1.doSomething(&objClass1); right? – Javier Nov 15 '10 at 23:20
    
@Javier: See my edit for more elaboration. – John Dibling Nov 15 '10 at 23:41
    
+1, nice explanation of the tricky out-of-line syntax. I think the <unsigned> in bar_1.doSomething<unsigned>(&foo_1); is not necessary though -- won't it be inferred? – j_random_hacker Nov 15 '10 at 23:57
    
@j: probably true. i cant check at this moment tho, and I usually just type the template params explicitly – John Dibling Nov 16 '10 at 0:17
    
@John,the definition/implementation of the template class is separated (.h & .cpp files) & also I include an .inc file @the end of the .cpp file to initialize the template classes,e.g,(bar-impl.inc) template class Bar<float>;template class Bar<int>; same for foo-impl.inc: template class Foo<int>;template class Foo<float>;(www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/templates.html#faq-35.13).Now,I get the msg: /tmp/ccBySVYZ.o: In function main': bar.cpp:(.text+0x19f):undefined reference to void Bar<float>::doSomething<float>(Foo<float>*)' collect2:ld returned 1 exit status make: *** [imagetest] Error 1 – Javier Nov 16 '10 at 9:06

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